Funders with specific interests

Funders with interest in a particular service area or service user group.

 

 

 

Funders with specific interests in

Funders with specific interest in advice and advocacy services

This section identifies funders who will fund specific advice and advocacy services. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

Access to Justice Foundation
http://www.atjf.org.uk

The aim of the ATJF is to improve access to legal justice for the most vulnerable in society, funding organisations that support those who need legal help but can’t afford it. They don’t have any current funding programmes open but advise that organisations keep an eye on their website where they will advertise new programmes

 

City Bridge Trust. Bridging Divides – Advice and Support
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/advice-and-support/

We believe that access to good quality advice and support plays a vital role in addressing inequalities. We believe such services should be informed by the voice and experience of those who are impacted by those inequalities.

We want applications on this programme to achieve at least one of the following outcomes:

  • More Londoners have improved economic circumstances.
  • Fewer Londoners experience food poverty.
  • More people access debt and legal services for support before they hit crisis point.

We therefore invite applications from organisations providing suitably accredited generalist or specialist advice. Applicant organisations must hold a recognised management qualification and/or advice quality standard, e.g. Advice Quality Standard; Specialist Quality Mark; Lexcel Practice Management Standard and support  individuals affected by inequalities, in relation to:

  • Benefits
  • Debt and money
  • Employment problems
  • Housing
  • Immigration status

In addition to accredited advice services, we will also fund organisations working to tackle food poverty in particular, food banks.

We particularly want to fund agencies supporting people with multiple and/or complex problems.

We welcome applications for up to 5 years funding and core funding will be considered.

 

City Bridge Trust Bridging Divides. Positive Transitions
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/positive-transitions/

We want to help Londoners experiencing inequality and disadvantage to make important transitions in their lives. We want to enable these transitions to be positive for the individuals, give them greater choice and control over their lives and result in a reduction in inequality within communities.

We want applications on this programme to achieve at least one of the following outcomes:
• Londoners experiencing inequality or disadvantage are supported to become more independent.
• Vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners are more resilient and empowered to make positive choices.
• Specialist support services are better able to meet the needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners.

Specialist support services for Deaf and disabled people to increase choice and control in their lives are specifically mentioned, as is their commitment to the social model of disability and “we want to support work that removes the barriers, physical or otherwise, that prevent disabled people (including people who are experiencing mental health difficulties and people with learning disabilities) from participating in society and living independently. We welcome applications from Deaf and Disabled People’s Organisations”.

They welcome applications for up to 5 years funding and core funding will be considered.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes Disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under several themes, one of which is health and wellbeing (which includes advice and information). They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes, which include advice and advocacy related themes of: helping people rebuild their lives following critical moment, crisis, trauma or abuse; enabling people to work towards or maintain accommodation /housing; and financial inclusion, rights and entitlements (including information and advice, support to navigate systems and claim entitlements, improving financial literacy).

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

 

Mrs Smith and Mount Trust. The Mount Fund
https://mrssmithandmounttrust.org/the-mount-fund/

The Mount Fund aims to assist disadvantaged people towards greater independence or a better quality of life. Priorities include mental health, learning difficulty and health in the community. Grants are usually between £3000-10,000, some repeated. Grants are for organisations with income under £1million (or up to £500,000 in the health in the community strand). Advice services are specifically mentioned as something they fund. Trustees meet 3 times per year.

 

Trust for London and City Bridge Trust – Strengthening Voices, Realising Rights
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/issues/people/disabled-people/strengthening-voices-realising-rights/

Strengthening Voices, Realising Rights is an independent funders’ initiative set up to support Deaf and Disabled people’s organisations (DDPOs) working to protect and promote equal rights and community inclusion for Deaf and Disabled Londoners. It is managed by Trust for London, and currently funded by Trust for London and City Bridge Trust.

The initiative aims to support DDPOs working to protect, promote and advance equal rights and community inclusion for Disabled Londoners by:

  • Providing funds to increase the availability of accessible, quality user-led services and activities to tackle poverty, challenge discrimination, and enable community inclusion across London;
  • Investing in the sector’s capacity by supporting DDPOs to become more connected, impactful, resilient and sustainable;
  • Sharing learning within the UK funding community to contribute to disability inclusive funding practices and joined up, strategic approaches to supporting the issues championed by DDPOs.

The first round of this funding closed in October 2018.  There is likely to be a further round in early 2019 (check website for details)

 

Trust for London
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with Disability as one of their priorities.  There is no minimum or maximum size of grant but the average will be around £80K in total over one to three years. They are unlikely to award grants over £150K.  There are 3 funding deadlines per year (see website for dates)

The funding programmes that cover advice and advocacy (including campaigning, organising, policy and research) are:

Good Homes and Neighbourhoods: Issues such as affordable and quality housing, provision of temporary accommodation, increasing tenants’ voice and influence, engaging people on low incomes in planning and regeneration, and improving quality of neighbourhood environments. Also, housing legal advice covering legal casework and representation in areas that fall outside of legal aid, particularly in relation to the private rented sector.

Better Work: Issues such as improving pay for those on low incomes, addressing exploitative employment practices and discrimination, improving the practice of public agencies, and promoting good employment practice. Also, employment legal advice covering legal casework and representation in areas that fall outside of legal aid which protects workers’ rights and tackles issues of discrimination. They will also fund tribunal work that ensures workers receive the wages and/ or settlements they are entitled to.

Decent Living Standards: Issues such as the impact of changes to the welfare support system, improving the welfare support system (including areas where there may be less of a spotlight, such as the additional costs of disability), highlighting the effect on low-income Londoners of public services, reducing the cost of living in London, improving understanding of public attitudes on social security and challenging stigma attached to reliance on social security, and the future role of social security and the state in preventing and tackling poverty and inequality in London. Also, legal representation in social welfare law at tribunals and strategic legal action on social security issues affecting low-income Londoners.

Shared Wealth: Issues such as improving the understanding of the impact of income and wealth inequality, reducing income inequality, improving understanding of public attitudes on income and wealth inequality, and examining how inclusive growth and devolution might be used to address economic inequality.

Trust for London Connected Communities
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/funding/our-funding-programmes/connected-communities/

Trust for London also have a funding strand for smaller organisations. They believe small community groups can contribute to improving the lives of people and communities in London by providing support for people to access services, to speak out about issues which directly affect them, and/or organise activities which help promote a sense of belonging. Small groups are defined as those that have an annual income of under £100,000 and grants under this programme will average £25K in total (over 1-3 years), with a maximum grant of £45K. They are looking to fund groups already providing social welfare advice and to improve the quality of that advice. You will need to show you have clear referral pathways to specialist advice where it is needed, and that you support and empower clients to resolve problems and take more control over their lives.
There are three application deadlines per year. See website for dates.

 

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Funders with specific interest in peer support services

This section identifies funders who will fund specific peer support services. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

 

Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities and in their social change strand they fund ambitious and challenging work that puts those who have been marginalised at the heart of creating change. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes, one of which is improving family and social support networks. Peer support approaches to their other priorities (see their website for details) are also likely to be attractive to Henry Smith given their interest in people being meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face.

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

The Henry Smith Charity – Strengthening Communities Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith will support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

As well as organisational characteristics above, for this programme they want organisations to be community led (recognising that the best solutions to problems are rooted in their community) and who are committed to equlity of opportunity and removing barriers to marginalised groups. They are interested in people from across the community being able to participate in activities that improve connectedness, opportunities and wellbeing; people who are excluded, vulnerable, or facing other forms of hardship having access to community based services that support positive change; and creating a stronger, active and more engaged community.

Strengthening Communities Grants are for small community-based organisations (£20-500K), working within the 10% most deprived areas of the UK. Awards of £20-60K per year over one to three years can support running costs (including salaries), project costs and small capital costs.

 

National Lottery Community Fund – Reaching Communities
https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/funding/programmes/reaching-communities-england

Reaching Communities make grants of over £10,000 in England, supporting organisations with great ideas that enable communities to thrive. Funding priorities are to:
• bring people together and build strong relationships in and across communities
• improve the places and spaces that matter to communities
• enable more people to fulfil their potential by working to address issues at the earliest possible stage.

Grants are awarded for up to five years, for project activities, operating costs, organisational development and capital costs. Through all our funding, we’re interested in supporting organisations that are:
• people led – meaningfully involving the people you’re working with in the development and delivery of your activity
• strengths based – making the most of the skills that already exist in communities
• connected – understanding what other relevant organisations are doing and developing good working relationships.

 

Peabody Community Fund – Administered through London Community Foundation
https://londoncf.org.uk/grants/peabody-community-fund

The Fund exists to support projects and activities designed to improve the quality of life of Peabody residents and the wider community. Projects must align with one or more of the three fund themes:
• Healthy – helping people with their physical and mental wellbeing
• Happy – helping people make the most out of their lives through active citizenship, volunteering and community involvement
• Wealthy – supporting people to become financially independent through employment, enterprise and education

The fund is able to support ongoing/regular activities who must primarily be Peabody residents. Priority will be given to:
• Organisations/projects addressing the needs of the most disadvantaged members of the community
• Peabody resident-led projects. If an applicant organisation is not resident-led, they will need to demonstrate strong connections with local residents, strong partnership working in the locality, a commitment to the locality after the proposed project is complete, and a clear understanding of community needs
• Youth-led projects up to the age of 24
• There will also be restricted funds for projects supporting Peabody residents living in Waltham Forest and Thamesmead (on the Bexley/Greenwich boroughs border)

Grants are available covering costs relating to your proposed project, and groups can request:
• Grants of up to £10,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £20,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income of £250,000 or less.
• Grants of up to £15,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £30,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income between £250,001 and £500,000.

There are two deadlines per year in July and December.

 

Trust for London and City Bridge Trust – Strengthening Voices, Realising Rights
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/issues/people/disabled-people/strengthening-voices-realising-rights/

Strengthening Voices, Realising Rights is an independent funders’ initiative set up to support Deaf and Disabled people’s organisations (DDPOs) working to protect and promote equal rights and community inclusion for Deaf and Disabled Londoners. It is managed by Trust for London, and currently funded by Trust for London and City Bridge Trust.

The initiative aims to support DDPOs working to protect, promote and advance equal rights and community inclusion for Disabled Londoners by:

  • Providing funds to increase the availability of accessible, quality user-led services and activities to tackle poverty, challenge discrimination, and enable community inclusion across London;
  • Investing in the sector’s capacity by supporting DDPOs to become more connected, impactful, resilient and sustainable;
  • Sharing learning within the UK funding community to contribute to disability inclusive funding practices and joined up, strategic approaches to supporting the issues championed by DDPOs.

The first round of this funding closed in October 2018 and was focused on advice services. There is likely to be a further round in early 2019 (check website for details)

Volunteering England
http://www.volunteeringfund.com/national-grant-scheme

Local and national funding streams. Funding for delivery of volunteer based schemes related to health/long term conditions/community/voice. Successful organizations get capacity building support as well as funding. You can get on their mailing list to keep up to date with when rounds are open.

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Funders with specific interest in community cohesion and development

This section identifies funders who will fund specific projects and services focused on community cohesion and development. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority

Asda Foundation
https://www.asdafoundation.org

The Asda Foundation provides grants to local charities and not-for-profit organisations that support and develop stronger communities. They fall into two categories:

Top-up funding grants offer extra financial support as one-off payments to local organisations. The initial step is to contact your local Asda store – if they are willing and able to support you, they will apply to the Asda Foundation for a top-up donation.

Local community projects grants offer help in managing, coordinating and delivering programmes that make a significant difference to local communities and the people who live there. They are available to charities and causes that have developed a relationship with their local Asda store at a grassroots level, that tackle underlying problems in the local community, can apply evidence from programmes of community needs and aspirations to develop their existing model, that benefit the wider community rather than just supporting a single user group, that fulfill a local need, will make a long-term difference, and would transform the local community, improving the lives of all those who live there. They can help with capital costs and equipment, not revenue funding, and can only help charities or not-for-profit organisations that already have a financial management system in place.

There are no minimum or maximum grants but recent awards have been in the £2K-£20K range. Applications considered on a rolling basis.


Barchester Healthcare Foundation
http://www.bhcfoundation.org.uk

This is a grant-giving charity that helps older people and Disabled adults (18+) to lead more fulfilled lives. The foundation’s focus is on connecting or re-connecting people with others in their local community, helping combat isolation and loneliness and enabling people to be active. Funding of between £100 and £5,000 is available for small community groups to help improve people’s mobility, independence and quality of life.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

City Bridge Trust Small Grants
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/connecting-the-capital/small-grants/

City Bridge Trust are offering small grants of up to £10,000 over 12 months to organisations with an annual income of less than £75,000 for projects which enable disabled people and/or older people who are disadvantaged to actively participate in the arts, sports and health and well-being opportunities, and for projects which bring communities together to improve their local environment

 

City Bridge Trust. Bridging Divides. Connecting the Capital
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/connecting-the-capital/

We want to help make London’s communities stronger, more resilient and thriving.  To achieve this, we believe that a healthy and vibrant voluntary sector, working with communities and across sectors, plays a vital role. One of the outcomes of interest is
that local communities have better, more sustainable, assets (financial, physical, environmental). City Bridge Trust offer grants for up to 5 years under this programme

 

Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities and in their social change strand they fund ambitious and challenging work that revitalises community life and motivates and enables communities to use their collective ideas, skills and assets to bring about change. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

Garfield Weston
http://www.garfieldweston.org

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. One of their priority areas is community and the trustees are particularly keen to see applications from charities in this strand, and in regions of economic disadvantage.
The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

Heathrow Community Fund- Communities Together
http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund

Communities Together invites grant applications from organisations working on projects that help people get to know one another and their neighbours, find ways to help and encourage those that may be excluded to get involved, improve community cohesion, or protect and enhance nature and the environment in your area. Small grants of up to £2,500 per year for up to two years are available for charities, voluntary groups and Community Interest Companies. We support significant and positive improvement in quality of life for communities near the airport and so eligible London boroughs are Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes, one of which is improving family and social support networks

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Strengthening Communities Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith will support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

As well as organisational characteristics above, for this programme they want organisations to be community led (recognising that the best solutions to problems are rooted in their community) and who are committed to equlity of opportunity and removing barriers to marginalised groups. They are interested in people from across the community being able to participate in activities that improve connectedness, opportunities and wellbeing; people who are excluded, vulnerable, or facing other forms of hardship having access to community based services that support positive change; and creating a stronger, active and more engaged community.

Strengthening Communities Grants are for small community-based organisations (£20-500K), working within the 10% most deprived areas of the UK. Awards of £20-60K per year over one to three years can support running costs (including salaries), project costs and small capital costs.

 

Home Office- Building a Stronger Britain Together
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/building-a-stronger-britain-together

The Building a Stronger Britain Together (BSBT) programme supports civil society and community organisations who work to create more resilient communities, stand up to extremism in all its forms and offer vulnerable individuals a positive alternative. To help groups expand their reach and influence, the Building a Stronger Britain Together programme offers two forms of support through a competitive bidding process:

Grants: targeted funding for specific projects with demonstrable outcomes which provide a positive alternative to extremist voices (the grants programme is closed for this year but it is worth checking back to see if it reopens at a later date)

In-kind support: such as social media training, technical assistance to help a group improve their website, or capacity building work to help a group protect more vulnerable individuals

The in-kind support is a rolling programme so is open for applications year round.

 

Improving Life for Londoners Fund http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/funds/tfl-cbt

This fund from Trust for London and City Bridge Trust helps organisations based and working in London to deliver projects that will address inequality and lift people out of poverty in the capital: using practical solutions to support people on low incomes; addressing local problems in creative ways; and led by communities that will benefit from the work. Funding is available to organisations using crowdfunding to raise funds. The fund will provide up to 50% of the target (up to a max of £10,000), with projects expected to raise at least the first 25% from the Crowd. Projects to start within three months of reaching their fundraising target, and last a maximum of one year

National Lottery Community Fund – Reaching Communities
https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/funding/programmes/reaching-communities-England

Reaching Communities make grants of over £10,000 in England, supporting organisations with great ideas that enable communities to thrive. Funding priorities are to:
• bring people together and build strong relationships in and across communities
• improve the places and spaces that matter to communities
• enable more people to fulfil their potential by working to address issues at the earliest possible stage.

Grants are awarded for up to five years, for project activities, operating costs, organisational development and capital costs. Through all our funding, we’re interested in supporting organisations that are:
• people led – meaningfully involving the people you’re working with in the development and delivery of your activity
• strengths based – making the most of the skills that already exist in communities
• connected – understanding what other relevant organisations are doing and developing good working relationships.

 

Neighbourhood Planning Support Funding (managed by Locality)
https://neighbourhoodplanning.org/

Locality are managing grant funding (from the government) to support local neighbourhood planning groups who want to have more of a say over development in their area.
Grants of £9K are available for groups writing a neighbourhood plan or neighbourhood development order and can cover costs including developing a website, putting together a project plan, undertaking a local survey, developing evidence base, or hiring a planning expert. An additional grant package of £6,000 and technical support is also available to groups that have complex issues. There is usually one application deadline each year. See the website for details

Our Place
http://mycommunityrights.org.uk/our-place

Aims to give people more power over local services and budgets in their neighbourhoods, aligning these with all the other resources that the community can bring. Communities and public service organisations will be supported to develop an operational plan and take control in their area to make sure that things work in the best way for local people. Support and funding offered.

Peabody Community Fund – Administered through London Community Foundation
https://londoncf.org.uk/grants/peabody-community-fund

The Fund exists to support projects and activities designed to improve the quality of life of Peabody residents and the wider community. Projects must align with one or more of the three fund themes:
• Healthy – helping people with their physical and mental wellbeing
• Happy – helping people make the most out of their lives through active citizenship, volunteering and community involvement
• Wealthy – supporting people to become financially independent through employment, enterprise and education

The fund is able to support ongoing/regular activities who must primarily be Peabody residents. Priority will be given to:
• Organisations/projects addressing the needs of the most disadvantaged members of the community
• Peabody resident-led projects. If an applicant organisation is not resident-led, they will need to demonstrate strong connections with local residents, strong partnership working in the locality, a commitment to the locality after the proposed project is complete, and a clear understanding of community needs
• Youth-led projects up to the age of 24
• There will also be restricted funds for projects supporting Peabody residents living in Waltham Forest and Thamesmead (on the Bexley/Greenwich boroughs border)

Grants are available covering costs relating to your proposed project, and groups can request:
• Grants of up to £10,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £20,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income of £250,000 or less.
• Grants of up to £15,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £30,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income between £250,001 and £500,000.

There are two deadlines per year in July and December.

Power to Change Community Business Fund
https://www.powertochange.org.uk/get-support/programmes/community-business-fund/

Offer grants of £50-300K to “community businesses” to improve their sustainability. Round 8 of this fund will be open from 11th September to 9th October 2019. Community Business are Locally rooted; Accountable to the local community; Trading for the benefit of the local community; and with a Broad community impact. The grants are not for ‘business as usual’. Your application must demonstrate how the funding will help you to start or increase your trading income, secure an asset or significantly reduce your costs. You must be contributing to at least one of Power to Change’s seven core impact areas which include reduce social isolation; enable greater community cohesion; and foster greater community pride and empowerment.

The Rayne Foundation
www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people.We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria.We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.

Sport England. Tackling Inactivity and Economic Disadvantage Fund
https://www.sportengland.org/news-and-features/news/2017/february/28/focus-on-tackling-inactivity-and-economic-disadvantage/

Sport England has launched a new £3 million fund to tackle inactivity and economic disadvantage. The initiative is based on the understanding that sport and physical activity can be powerful drivers in positive social change for communities and individuals, and can help support mental wellbeing, drive down crime rates and reduce social isolation. With this in mind, Sport England are looking to work with community organisations with a proven reach to the target individuals and communities.

There will be two strands of this fund: £2m will go towards larger projects (<£500K) to support people with little disposable income who live ordered lives but find it hard to incorporate physical activity, or feel that being active is not for them.

The other £1m will be for smaller projects (£10-100k) focusing on people who are less likely to have a steady or any income and live more chaotic lives with additional challenges (e.g. offending background, alcohol/drug misuse and/or mental health issues).

The Spring Fund
http://bpsfoundation.org.uk/what-we-do/the-spring-fund/

The Spring Fund, part of the Battersea Power Station Foundation, offers grants of up to £5K to help communities in Lambeth and Wandsworth with projects that bring together residents, volunteers, businesses and local authorities to strengthen neighbourhood bonds, create new opportunities and transform lives. Their aim is to fund smaller, grassroots community efforts that energise neighbourhoods. They believe bringing people together around a common purpose opens up social and economic opportunities for all.

Organisations should show strong community ties to Lambeth or Wandsworth and meet at least some of these requirements: encourage better connections between and amongst local communities; improve the wellbeing of local people by building their confidence and strength of character; open up new economic opportunities for residents; create locally-based solutions to improve community conditions; motivate residents to join in with neighbourhood activities; and improve the capabilities of local organisations to deal with neighbourhood issues.

They will not fund capital developments and equipment

Applications accepted throughout the year.

Trust for London Connected Communities
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/funding/our-funding-programmes/connected-communities/

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with Disability as one of their priorities.

One of their new funding programmes is Connected Communities. Trust for London believe small community groups can contribute to improving the lives of people and communities in London by providing support for people to access services, to speak out about issues which directly affect them, and/or organise activities which help promote a sense of belonging. Small groups are defined as those that have an annual income of under £100,000 and grants under this programme will average £25K in total (over 1-3 years), with a maximum grant of £45K. Within this programme, they are specifically looking to fund groups of people who are directly experiencing poverty and inequality, to speak out for themselves and to campaign for positive change; community activities, led by communities in isolated areas; and groups already providing social welfare advice and to improve the quality of that advice.

There are 3 application deadlines per year (see website for details)

Volunteering Fund
http://www.volunteeringfund.com/national-grant-scheme

Local and national funding streams. Funding for delivery of volunteer based schemes related to community development. Successful organizations get capacity building support as well as funding

Wakefield and Tetley Trust
www.wakefieldtrust.org.uk/

Beneficiaries in Tower Hamlets, Southwark and City of London only. Improving lives of disadvantaged people with limited choice and opportunities, through reducing barriers, encouraging social inclusion and building community. Maximum one year grants. Average award £6,600 and nearly all under £10,000.

 


Funders with specific interest in social justice, campaigning, policy, voice and awareness raising work

This section identifies funders who will fund specific social justice, campaigning, policy, voice and awareness raising work. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

 

AB Charitable Trust
www.abcharitabletrust.org.uk/

The A B Charitable Trust (ABCT) supports charities that defend human rights and promote respect for vulnerable individuals whatever their circumstances. The Trust is particularly interested in charities that work with marginalised and excluded people in society, with a focus including:
• migrants, refugees and asylum seekers
• criminal justice and penal reform
• human rights, particularly access to justice
Charities must have income between £150k and £1.5m, and grants are usually between 10-20K.

 

Access to Justice Foundation
http://www.atjf.org.uk

The aim of the ATJF is to improve access to legal justice for the most vulnerable in society, funding organisations that support those who need legal help but can’t afford it. They don’t have any current funding programmes open but advise that organisations keep an eye on their website where they will advertise new programmes

 

Allen and Overy Foundation (London)
www.allenovery.com/corporate-responsibility/charitable-giving/Pages/Local-charitable-giving.aspx

They give grants of £5-£10K for charities which work to promote access to justice in the UK. Application deadlines in September and February


Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000. Have previously funded disability equality training in schools
provided by Disabled people.

 

Edge Fund
http://edgefund.org.uk

Edge Fund is a grant-making body with a difference. We support efforts to achieve social, economic and environmental justice and to end imbalances in wealth and power – and give those we aim to help a say in where the money goes. Edge Fund like to fund independent groups who find traditional sources of funding closed to them, particularly grass roots organisations working on social or ecological change. Grants are usually small, up to £5K maximum but usually smaller than this.


Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities and in their social change strand they fund ambitious and challenging work that supports marginalised and excluded individuals and groups to participate, or that brings about systemic change re: injustice and inequality. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

John Ellerman Foundation
http://ellerman.org.uk/

We aim to advance the wellbeing of people, society and the natural world by focusing on the arts, environment and social action. We believe these areas, both separately and together, can make an important contribution to wellbeing. Under the Social Action strand, we aim to help create a society where all can thrive, by supporting organisations which work to create positive changes in practice, systems and institutions. Interested in work which improves systems and institutions through policy, advocacy and campaigning, and actively involves those with personal experience of the issue tackled. They tend to fund small to medium sized organisations with a national reach. Organisations much have income between £100,000 and £10million. Grants for their social action strand are about £30-40K per year for up to 3 years.

 

Porticus
https://uk.porticus.com/en/home

Porticus are interested in organisations promoting human dignity and justice. Particularly relevant to DDPOs are their “society” strand where they are interested in creative, practical approaches to social concerns and their “care” strand where they are interested in approaches to address multiple disadvantage and exclusion. Their grants are usually for over £10K. The fund core costs or project costs. They don’t accept unsolicited applications, but they invite organisations to send a letter of introduction informing them of what the organisation does. If they are interested, they will then contact the organisation.

 

People’s Postcode Trust
http://www.postcodetrust.org.uk/applying-for-a-grant

People’s Postcode Trust funds projects in Great Britain of up to 12 months in length, with grants up to £20K (Unregistered organisations can apply for small grants under £2K). Projects are programmes of work which are limited in scope and seek to achieve particular outcomes focused on one of the funds priorities. These priorities don’t specifically include disability but do include promoting human rights, combatting discrimination and preventing poverty. There are 2 funding rounds per year-see website for dates.

 

Trust for London
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with Disability as one of their priorities. There is no minimum or maximum size of grant but the average will be around £80K in total over one to three years. They are unlikely to award grants over £150K. They have 3 application deadlines per year-see website for dates

The funding programmes that cover voice and awareness raising work are:
Stronger Voices, looking at amplifying the voices of those who are experiencing the problems which civil society is trying to address. Within this programme, they will fund second-tier and specialist organisations to help other organisations improve their skills and practice, specifically in: campaigning (including community organising), strategic communications (supporting the understanding of public attitudes through the development of framing, narratives and messages), and increasing the involvement of people with lived experience of poverty and inequality in campaigning and leadership of organisations and movements.

Connected Communities: Trust for London believe small community groups can contribute to improving the lives of people and communities in London by providing support for people to access services, to speak out about issues which directly affect them, and/or organise activities which help promote a sense of belonging. Small groups are defined as those that have an annual income of under £100,000 and grants under this programme will average £25K in total (over 1-3 years), with a maximum grant of £45K. They are looking to fund groups of people who are directly experiencing poverty and inequality, to speak out for themselves and to campaign for positive change. This could include work to: improve confidence and skills; respond to new issues and identify solutions; and/or set up new campaigns, or influence established ones.


Wyseliot Charitable Trust
Applications made in writing to Jonathan Rose, The Wyseliot Charitable Trust, 17 Chelsea Square, London SW3 6LF

Funding available to charitable organisations in the UK for general charitable purposes. There is no maximum level for grants but previous grants have been for between £2,000 and £5,000 and applications can be submitted at any time. Priorities include advancement of human rights, conflict resolution or reconciliation, or the promotion of equality and diversity (as well as disability)

 

The Yapp Charitable Trust
http://www.yappcharitabletrust.org.uk

Awards grants for running costs and salaries to small registered charities in England and Wales to help sustain their existing work. Funds given only to charitable companies older than three years with a total annual expenditure of less than £40,000, who undertake work with one of the trust’s priority groups – one of which is people with physical impairments, learning difficulties and/or mental health challenges. Grants are only given to running costs, not new projects, extra services or additional delivery costs, and are normally for a maximum of £3,000 per year, for up to three years. Priority given to charities that improve the lives of marginalised, disadvantaged or isolated people; that work through raising awareness of issues, education and campaigning; and that demonstrate an effective use of volunteers and elements of self sustainability. Applications are considered throughout the year.

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Funders with specific interest in hate crime and violence

This section identifies funders who will fund specific work on hate crime and violence. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

 

City Bridge Trust Bridging Divides. Postive Transitions
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/positive-transitions/

We want to help Londoners experiencing inequality and disadvantage to make important transitions in their lives. We want to enable these transitions to be positive for the individuals, give them greater choice and control over their lives and result in a reduction in inequality within communities.

We want applications on this programme to achieve at least one of the following outcomes:
• Londoners experiencing inequality or disadvantage are supported to become more independent.
• Vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners are more resilient and empowered to make positive choices.
• Specialist support services are better able to meet the needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners.

Survivors of hate crime are specifically mentioned as one of the target groups. In addition they specifically state they are committed to the social model of disability and want to support work that removes the barriers, physical or otherwise, that prevent disabled people and older people from participating in society and living independently. They welcome applications from Deaf and Disabled People’s Organisations.

They welcome applications for up to 5 years funding and core funding will be considered.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes one of which is helping people rebuild their lives following critical moment, crisis, trauma or abuse

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Strengthening Communities Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith will support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

As well as organisational characteristics above, for this programme they want organisations to be community led (recognising that the best solutions to problems are rooted in their community) and who are committed to equlity of opportunity and removing barriers to marginalised groups. They are interested in people from across the community being able to participate in activities that improve connectedness, opportunities and wellbeing; people who are excluded, vulnerable, or facing other forms of hardship having access to community based services that support positive change; and creating a stronger, active and more engaged community.

Strengthening Communities Grants are for small community-based organisations (£20-500K), working within the 10% most deprived areas of the UK. Awards of £20-60K per year over one to three years can support running costs (including salaries), project costs and small capital costs.

Home Office- Building a Stronger Britain Together
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/building-a-stronger-britain-together

The Building a Stronger Britain Together (BSBT) programme supports civil society and community organisations who work to create more resilient communities, stand up to extremism in all its forms and offer vulnerable individuals a positive alternative. To help groups expand their reach and influence, the Building a Stronger Britain Together programme offers two forms of support through a competitive bidding process:

Grants: targeted funding for specific projects with demonstrable outcomes which provide a positive alternative to extremist voices (the grants programme is closed for this year but it is worth checking back to see if it reopens at a later date)

In-kind support: such as social media training, technical assistance to help a group improve their website, or capacity building work to help a group protect more vulnerable individuals

The in-kind support is a rolling programme so is open for applications year round.

 

Mayor of London Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) Small grants

Safer neighbourhood boards have access to funding from MOPAC for small projects (grants between £5000-£6000). DDPOs who are part of these boards can suggest projects

Project ideas that have been supported in the past include crime prevention advice and/or materials in areas where there is evidence they are targeted for specific types of crime; specific pieces of engagement or development work by organisations connected to the SNB functions; police and public engagement events, either larger, borough-wide events, or targeted at specific audiences or around specific crime types; diversion opportunities to identified groups who may be at risk of committing crime.

 

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Funders with specific interest in employment support and skills development (including youth development) 

This section identifies funders who will fund specific employment and skills development support. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority, and the list of grants for individuals.

 

Allen and Overy Foundation (London)
www.allenovery.com/corporate-responsibility/charitable-giving/Pages/Local-charitable-giving.aspx

They give grants of £5-£10K for projects focusing on issues of education, employment and training, based in or benefiting those in Tower Hamlets or Hackney. Application deadlines in September and February

 

DM Thomas Foundation for Young People https://dmthomasfoundation.org/what-we-do/grants/

The DMT Foundation accepts applications for its Central Grants Scheme from registered charities in the UK. Applications working in the area of education or health with one of their chosen focus groups will be considered (Disabled children are one of priority groups). Previous grants have included work experience and training programmes for young people.

Applications for up to £5000 are approved by their Director, up to £10,000 by their Grants Committee and £10,000 plus by their Trustees (quarterly). Maximum awarded is usually £30K per year.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes Disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under several themes, one of which is transition (including training, development and employment support). They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities including education. Interested in improving support for disadvantaged young people, improving the rights of vulnerable children and young people, addressing root causes of low attainment and challenging behaviour, empowering young leaders. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

Garfield Weston
https://garfieldweston.org/

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. Their priority themes include education and youth with trustees particularly keen to see applications from the Youth sectors and also in regions of economic disadvantage.
The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

Heathrow Community Fund
http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund

Projects for Young People invites grant applications from organisations working on projects that give young people new skills help them into employment, raise aspirations or increase resilience. Grants of up to £25,000 per year for up to two years are available for charities, voluntary groups and Community Interest Companies. We support significant and positive improvement in quality of life for communities near the airport and so eligible London boroughs are Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes one of which is training and support to move towards employment

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

 

Lennox and Wyfold Foundation
Mr G Fincham, Lennox and Wyfold Foundation, 15 Suffolk Street, London, SW1Y 4HG Tel: 02036966721

Grants to registered charities in England and Wales. There is no minimum or maximum level of grant. Most grants range from £5,000 to £10,000. Priorities include education and training, as well as disability.
Applications may be submitted at any time and are considered twice a year by the Trustees. The Foundation only accepts written applications.

 

Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust
http://www.margaretdobsontrust.btck.co.uk

The Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust supports organisations working with young adults aged 18 to 25 years with a learning difficulty who are leaving formal education. The Trust aims to give these young people the practical skills needed to prepare them to be able to lead independent lives and will fund projects designed to support young people outside the school environment. Applications that demonstrate the involvement of people with learning difficulties and their families, partnership working, a demand for the project and either match funding or active fundraising are more likely to be successful.

Grants are usually for up to £5K, awarded annually, with deadlines usually in March.

 

Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Youth Fund
https://www.phf.org.uk/funds/youth-fund/

The Youth Fund supports organisations whose main purpose is about helping young people (aged 14-25) in the most precarious positions, where making the transition to adult independence is most challenging. The Fund supports organisations which work with young people experiencing disadvantage in a way that recognises and builds on their strengths and potential – we refer to this as an asset-based approach. Such approaches can include ‘strengths-based’, ‘advantaged thinking’, or ‘asset-based community development’ practices.
Organisations may be planning to grow their impact by:
• Replicating a programme or service
• Widening the reach of an idea or innovation
• Spreading a technology or skill
• Advancing policy or enhancing its implementation
• Influencing attitudes
The Fund will provide core funding to organisations within the youth sector and outside. Applications are accepted throughout the year. Grants are usually for up to 2 years totalling £30-£60K

 

Peabody Community Fund – Administered through London Community Foundation https://londoncf.org.uk/grants/peabody-community-fund

The Fund exists to support projects and activities designed to improve the quality of life of Peabody residents and the wider community. Projects must align with one or more of the three fund themes:
• Healthy – helping people with their physical and mental wellbeing
• Happy – helping people make the most out of their lives through active citizenship, volunteering and community involvement
• Wealthy – supporting people to become financially independent through employment, enterprise and education

The fund is able to support ongoing/regular activities who must primarily be Peabody residents. Priority will be given to:
• Organisations/projects addressing the needs of the most disadvantaged members of the community
• Peabody resident-led projects. If an applicant organisation is not resident-led, they will need to demonstrate strong connections with local residents, strong partnership working in the locality, a commitment to the locality after the proposed project is complete, and a clear understanding of community needs
• Youth-led projects up to the age of 24
• There will also be restricted funds for projects supporting Peabody residents living in Waltham Forest and Thamesmead (on the Bexley/Greenwich boroughs border)

Grants are available covering costs relating to your proposed project, and groups can request:
• Grants of up to £10,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £20,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income of £250,000 or less.
• Grants of up to £15,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £30,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income between £250,001 and £500,000.

There are two deadlines per year in July and December.

 

The Peter Cruddas Foundation
http://www.petercruddasfoundation.org.uk/

The Foundation gives priority to programmes designed to help disadvantaged and disengaged young people in the age range of 16 to 30, to pursue pathways to Education, Training and Employment with the ultimate aim of helping them to become financially independent. Registered charities in England and Wales can apply (currently not CIC’s or Social Enterprises). There is no minimum or maximum in terms of the size of grant that organisations can apply for, and projects can be funded for more than one year.

 

Power to Change Community Business Fund
https://www.powertochange.org.uk/get-support/programmes/community-business-fund/

Offer grants of £50-300K to “community businesses” to improve their sustainability. Round 8 of this fund will be open from 11th September to 9th October 2019. Community Business are Locally rooted; Accountable to the local community; Trading for the benefit of the local community; and with a Broad community impact. The grants are not for ‘business as usual’. Your application must demonstrate how the funding will help you to start or increase your trading income, secure an asset or significantly reduce your costs. You must be contributing to at least one of Power to Change’s seven core impact areas which include increasing employability.

Sheldon Trust
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

They fund projects to alleviate poverty. Their focus includes youth development. They will fund revenue, capital or running costs. Usually about 5K and to organisations with income under £1million

 

Sport Relief Dispossessed Fund
(managed by London Community Foundation) http://www.londoncf.org.uk/grants/sport-relief-dispossessed-fund.aspx

Grants up to £20,000 for organizations with income less than £250,000. Range of priorities relating to poverty including training, education and mentoring. Annual deadline, usually May

 

Trust for London
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/funding/our-funding-programmes/better-work/

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with Disability as one of their priorities. There is no minimum or maximum size of grant but the average will be around £80K in total over one to three years. They are unlikely to award grants over £150K. There are 3 application deadlines per year-see website for details

Better Work is one of their new funding programmes, looking at low pay and the abuse of rights in the workplace, and ways of making sure all workers are treated with decency, respect and paid at least a living wage. Within this programme, they are specifically funding approaches that support progression routes out of low-paid work (including advice, training and support), employment legal advice (in areas that fall outside of legal aid), advocacy work (including campaigning, organising, policy work and research), and improving the capacity and skills of civil society (funding second-tier organisations to support other groups to improve their practice, share knowledge and influence on employment-related issues).

 

Volunteering Fund
http://www.volunteeringfund.com/national-grant-scheme

Local and national funding streams. Funding for delivery of volunteer based schemes related to health/long term conditions/community/voice. Successful organizations get capacity building support as well as funding. Can get on mailing list to keep up to date with deadlines.

 

The Will Charitable Trust
www.willcharitabletrust.org.uk

The Trust provides financial assistance to charities with priorities including employment activities for people with learning difficulties. Grants vary in amount, but generally fall within the range of £5,000 to £20,000, and are usually one-off annual grants. They prefer to fund individual projects but may fund core running costs under exceptional circumstances.

Applications are to be submitted between November and January, with decisions made in April.

 

Youth Music
http://network.youthmusic.org.uk/

Funding for music related projects, including skills development/training. They have priorities for young people facing challenges (including disability)

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Funders with specific interest in housing and accommodation

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes one of which is enabling people to work towards or maintain accomodation/housing

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

Trust for London
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk/funding/our-funding-programmes/good-homes-and-neighbourhoods/

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with disability as one of their priorities.

One of their new funding programmes is Good Homes and Neighbourhoods, looking at creating access to genuinely affordable, good quality, secure housing, with green spaces and a sense of community. Within this programme, they are specifically looking to fund advocacy work (including campaigning, organising, policy and research), housing legal advice (in areas of that fall outside of legal aid, particularly in relation to the private rented sector), and improving the capacity and skills of civil society (funding second-tier organisations to support other groups to improve their practice, share knowledge and influence on housing-related issues).

There is no minimum or maximum size of grant but the average will be around £80K in total over one to three years. They are unlikely to award grants over £150K. There are 3 application deadlines per year –see website for details

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Funders with specific interest in sports, leisure, arts and cultural activities

This section identifies funders who will fund specific sports, leisure, arts and cultural activities. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

 

Boost Charitable Foundation
http://www.boostct.org

Small grants of £500 for  boosting sport opportunities which champion the disabled and disadvantaged

 

Bruce Wake Charitable Trust
https://brucewaketrust.co.uk

The Bruce Wake Trust was established to encourage and assist the provision of leisure activities for Disabled people. The trustees will consider grant applications related to the provision of leisure activities for Disabled people with a particular emphasis on supporting wheelchair users. The trustees meet quarterly to discuss applications, which can be submitted at any time.

 

City Bridge Trust. Bridging Divides. Connecting the Capital
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/connecting-the-capital/

City Bridge Trust are interested in funding initiatives which enable disadvantaged people who are disabled and/or older people to actively participate in the arts, sports and health and well-being opportunities. We want to fund work that provides older or disabled people with opportunities to increase their health and well-being. They offer both large and small grants under this objective.

 

Cockayne
(administered through London Community Foundation http://www.londoncf.org.uk/downloads/Guidelines%2023%20APRIL%202014.pdf)

Support art as a way of enriching life experience. Grants are focused on arts projects in London that provide opportunities to artists from diverse cultures for the creation, development, performance, or exhibition in the performing (music, opera, dance, theatre) literary, or visual arts.

Current priorities are:

1. New work that demonstrates the potential: for artistic excellence, to reach large and diverse audiences, and/or to make a significant, new contribution to the art form.

2. Art that is experimental, risk-taking, and/or engages controversial issues.

3. Projects that involve young artists.

Annual deadline in January. Some borough restrictions. Please read the Fund Guidelines for full details.

 

Country Landowners Charitable Trust
https://www.cla.org.uk/about-cla/cla-charitable-trust

The CLA Charitable Trust provides education, recreation and facilities in the countryside for Disabled people, particularly the young. Its priorities include education about the countryside for young people from towns and cities, and the provision of facilities for (young) Disabled people to visit and participate in learning experiences about the countryside.

Grants average at around £2K. Applications welcome throughout the year from small charities.

 

Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities and in their arts strand they recognise the power of culture to bring communities together and give opportunity and visibility to people who may otherwise be marginalised. They fund art with a social impact, supporting emerging talent and organisations at a pivotal point. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

Gardening for Disabled Trust
http://gardeningfordisabledtrust.org.uk

This is a small trust that provides grants to help enable Disabled people to start or continue gardening. Funds are awarded to help adapt private gardens, towards paying for tools, raised beds, paving, wheelchair access and greenhouses. They also provide grants towards specially adapted gardens in hospitals, centres and schools, and offer information on garden aids and techniques.

Applications are reviewed monthly.

 

Garfield Weston
https://garfieldweston.org/

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. Their priority themes include the arts. The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

GLA Culture Seeds Programme
https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/arts-and-culture/current-culture-projects/culture-seeds

You can apply at any time until March 2020 for funding between £1,000-£5,000.
The new grants will be used to support community-led cultural projects in every London borough. Not-for-profit, small or informal organisations and groups with income less than £50K, as well as individuals, can apply.
The Mayor wants to see more local arts and culture activities created and put on by local people in London. That’s why Culture Seeds is aimed firmly at grassroots organisations.
The grants are for funding arts, culture and heritage projects and activities. Projects must have local people at their heart. We want projects that offer shared creative experiences to bring communities together. We will prioritise projects that support people on lower incomes, and connect communities that lack access to cultural resources and funding.

 

The Hedley Foundation
http://www.hedleyfoundation.org.uk

Awards grants averaging £3000 to small charities working with young people (11-25) in the areas of recreation, sport, training, health and welfare. One of their priority groups is disabled and terminally ill young people, who they support through funding for specialist equipment and respite breaks and holidays; the foundation also supports young carers. They do not fund core costs.

Trustees meet every two months and applications are welcome throughout the year.

 

The Henry Smith Charity
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Have a programme of holiday grants for children – one-off short grants of £500 – £2,500 towards recreational trips and holidays for groups of children aged 13 and under who are disabled or disadvantaged, with priority given to the 20% most deprived areas in the UK.

Ongoing funding stream with no deadline.

 

Lennox and Wyfold Foundation
Mr G Fincham, Lennox and Wyfold Foundation, 15 Suffolk Street, London, SW1Y 4HG Tel: 02036966721

Grants to registered charities in England and Wales. There is no minimum or maximum level of grant. Most grants range from £5,000 to £10,000. Priorities include arts, culture, sports and recreation, as well as disability.
Applications may be submitted at any time and are considered twice a year by the Trustees. The Foundation only accepts written applications.

 

Les Mills Fund for Children
https://lesmillsfundforchildren.org.uk/ourwork/

The fund supports various projects which work with children (including Disabled children) aged 0-16 to promote and encourage healthy lifestyles and active lives. Within this they fund sports activities for children. Grants are for up to £1000. Funding deadlines are every 4 months

 

London Sport
http://londonsport.org/training-and-support/funding-update/

A directory of grant makers with an interest in sport and physical activity.

 

Lord Leonard and Lady Estelle Wolfson Foundation
http://www.lordandladywolfson.org.uk/about.html

Interested in funding work which prevents or mitigates against illness, and creates innovative healthcare delivery mechanisms. Their interests include work which uses arts and music to do this. They have specific project aims each year. They tend to fund projects up to £250K.
To contact for more details: admin@lordandladywolfson.org.uk

 

Paul Hamlyn Foundation – Access and Participation Fund
https://www.phf.org.uk/funds/access-and-participation-fund/#the-purpose-of-the-fund

All grants under this fund are concerned with addressing inequalities of opportunity to access and participation in the arts. Two types of grant are available to support work at different stages of development:
• Access and participation ‘explore and test’ grants – offering funding for up to two years to help test new approaches or gather evidence for the first time about approaches that have been used before
• Access and participation ‘more and better’ grants – offering longer, larger grants to help increase the impact and effectiveness of work which has already shown promise or positive impact.

 

Paul Hamlyn Foundation – Arts Based Learning Fund
https://www.phf.org.uk/funds/arts-based-learning-fund/#the-purpose-of-the-fund

The overall purpose of this fund is to support arts organisations working with schools, colleges and other education environments to improve the evidence base for their work, so that they can do more to enhance the lives, development and achievements of children and young people. In particular, we want to support high quality arts-based learning activities that bring about and evidence positive and sustained change in one or more of six priority areas:
1. Young people’s academic achievements
2. Young people’s achievements and progression within one or more artforms
3. Young people’s soft-skills and or well-being, social, moral and or cultural development
4. Young people’s access to, and participation in, arts-based learning activities
5. Whole school culture, integration, cohesion and/or community relationships
6. Staff knowledge, confidence and skills in delivering arts-based learning activities
Two types of grant are available under this Fund to support work at different stages of development:
• Arts-based Learning ‘explore and test’ grants – offering funding for up to two years to help test new approaches or gather evidence for the first time about approaches that have been used before.
• Arts-based Learning ‘more and better’ grants – offering longer, larger grants to help increase the impact and effectiveness of work which has already shown promise or positive impact.

 

Peabody Community Fund – Administered through London Community Foundation
https://londoncf.org.uk/grants/peabody-community-fund

The Fund exists to support projects and activities designed to improve the quality of life of Peabody residents and the wider community. Projects must align with one or more of the three fund themes:
• Healthy – helping people with their physical and mental wellbeing
• Happy – helping people make the most out of their lives through active citizenship, volunteering and community involvement
• Wealthy – supporting people to become financially independent through employment, enterprise and education

The fund is able to support ongoing/regular activities who must primarily be Peabody residents. Priority will be given to:
• Organisations/projects addressing the needs of the most disadvantaged members of the community
• Peabody resident-led projects. If an applicant organisation is not resident-led, they will need to demonstrate strong connections with local residents, strong partnership working in the locality, a commitment to the locality after the proposed project is complete, and a clear understanding of community needs
• Youth-led projects up to the age of 24
• There will also be restricted funds for projects supporting Peabody residents living in Waltham Forest and Thamesmead (on the Bexley/Greenwich boroughs border)

Grants are available covering costs relating to your proposed project, and groups can request:
• Grants of up to £10,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £20,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income of £250,000 or less.
• Grants of up to £15,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £30,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income between £250,001 and £500,000.

There are two deadlines per year in July and December.

 

Peter Harrison Foundation – Opportunities through Sport
http://www.peterharrisonfoundation.org/opportunities-through-sport

Grants of £1K – £30K available to projects which provide opportunities for Disabled or disadvantaged people to develop personal and life skills through sport. They welcome applications for projects that provide a focus for skills development and confidence building through the medium of sport, projects that provide sporting equipment or facilities for Disabled people, and/or those with a high degree of community involvement.

Awards will often be one-off grants for capital projects, however they will consider revenue funding for a new project or if funding is key to the continuing success or survival of an established project.

Applications welcome throughout the year.


Post Code Trust
http://www.postcodetrust.org.uk/

Annual funding round for their “dreams” programme giving larger grants up to £250K with a focus on encouraging healthy living.

 

The Rayne Foundation
http://www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people.We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria.We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.

 

Sport England
https://www.sportengland.org

Since 2012, Sport England have made disability sport a key focus of their work, investing over £170 million. In addition, there are a number of new funding streams open to applications:

Facilities – £7.5m fund to invest in facilities, especially multi-sport. The Community Asset Fund will award grants of £5-150k to organisations looking to take over sports facilities, sports clubs looking to expand, or ideas for projects clearly needed in the local community.

 

Sport England Small Grants Programme
https://www.sportengland.org/funding/small-grants/

Sport England are offering small grants of £300 to £10,000 to get more people in England engaged in sport. Projects need to meet one or more of the “Towards an Active Nation” strategy aims: Get inactive people to become more active, develop more resilient sporting habits, lead to more positive attitudes among young people, develop more diverse volunteers, and improve progression and inclusion in talent development.

Funding will be awarded to projects for adults and young people aged 14+ that last up to 12 months, are focused on Sport England-recognised sports, and provide a new activity that delivers sport and physical activity benefits or one that shows a clear expansion on existing activity. Funding will not be given for existing activities, replacement equipment or running costs.

The total cost of the project must be less than £50,000.
This is a rolling programme with no application deadline. Enquiries welcome: call 0345 8508508 or email funding@sportengland.org

 

Sport England. Families Fund
https://www.sportengland.org/funding/families-fund/

Sport England has announced the Families Fund, a new £40 million investment into projects which offer new opportunities for families with children to get active and play sport together.

The focus is on families with children aged 5-15, with a particular emphasis on low-income families and those living in areas of high deprivation with inactive children (active for less than one hour each day).

Sport England are looking to invest in and work with organisations, both sporting and non-sporting, who understand children and families and have a proven track record of working with them (including charities). The aim of the fund is to encourage families to plan and take decisions together, with children involved in shaping how they and their families are active. The anticipated size of funding per project will be £50-500k.

There will be several rounds of this funding so keep an eye on their website for dates of the next round.

 

Sport England. Tackling Inactivity and Economic Disadvantage Fund https://www.sportengland.org/news-and-features/news/2017/february/28/focus-on-tackling-inactivity-and-economic-disadvantage/

Sport England has launched a new £3 million fund to tackle inactivity and economic disadvantage. The initiative is based on the understanding that sport and physical activity can be powerful drivers in positive social change for communities and individuals, and can help support mental wellbeing, drive down crime rates and reduce social isolation. With this in mind, Sport England are looking to work with community organisations with a proven reach to the target individuals and communities.

There will be two strands of this fund: £2m will go towards larger projects (<£500K) to support people with little disposable income who live ordered lives but find it hard to incorporate physical activity, or feel that being active is not for them.

The other £1m will be for smaller projects (£10-100k) focusing on people who are less likely to have a steady or any income and live more chaotic lives with additional challenges (e.g. offending background, alcohol/drug misuse and/or mental health issues).

 

Sport Relief Dispossessed Fund (managed by London Community Foundation)
http://www.londoncf.org.uk/grants/sport-relief-dispossessed-fund.aspx

Grants up to £20,000 for organizations with income less than £250,000. Range of priorities relating to poverty. Includes services to support health and well being (including sports clubs). Annual deadline. Usually May.

 

Sylvia Waddiliove Foundation
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

Priorities include visual and performing arts, as well as disability and illness. Usually small grants. Trustees meet four times per year

 

Thompson Family Charitable Trust

Provides grants to registered charities for general charitable purposes across the UK, with preference shown for charities in the London area. Most grants awarded are between £1K and £50K, with sports and the arts among their priorities. Repeat awards are not uncommon.

The trust does not have a website or a formal application form: for more information / to apply contact Katie Woodward, The Thompson Family Charitable Trust, Hillsdown Court, 15 Totteridge Common, London, N20 8LR.

 

Trusthouse Charitable Foundation
http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk

Grants to small, well-established organisations in the UK with annual income under £500K, who address local issues in areas of extreme urban deprivation. Grants can be for running costs or one off capital costs. Particular interests include arts, and Disabled people are named as a priority. Their urban grants are only for projects in urban areas classified in the latest government Indices of Multiple Deprivation as being in the lowest 20%. Applications can be made at any time.

Small grants are usually decided within 6 weeks. These are grants of between £2-7.5K and 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere (small grants are only available to organisations with income under £250K).

Large grants go to quarterly Committee meetings in January, April, July and November. These range from single year grants from £7500 to multi year grants of up to 20K per year. 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere.

 

Wheels for Good
http://www.wheelsforgood.com

Part of the EDAM umbrella group, Wheels for Good give donations to registered charities for causes related to wheels. Past donations have included towards children’s wheelchairs, wheelchair dancing and other wheelchair sports events, contributions to minibuses and toy cars to children’s hospitals. Applications are via an online form and are welcome throughout the year.

Wyseliot Charitable Trust
Applications made in writing to Jonathan Rose, The Wyseliot Charitable Trust, 17 Chelsea Square, London SW3 6LF

Funding available to charitable organisations in the UK for general charitable purposes. There is no maximum level for grants but previous grants have been for between £2,000 and £5,000 and applications can be submitted at any time. Priorities include arts, culture and heritage (as well as disability).

Youth Music
http://network.youthmusic.org.uk/

Funding for music related projects. They have priorities for children facing challenges (including disability)

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Funders with specific interest in learning difficulties

Childwick Trust

http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

The Inman Charity

http://www.inmancharity.org/

Grants of £3-5K are awarded to registered charities, with priorities including charities supporting people with learning difficulties. They particularly like to support specific projects and do not offer grants to individuals. There are two rounds of funding awarded each year – applications must be received by the end of February or the end of August each year.

 

Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust http://www.margaretdobsontrust.btck.co.uk

The Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust supports organisations working with young adults aged 18 to 25 years with a learning difficulty who are leaving formal education. The Trust aims to give these young people the practical skills needed to prepare them to be able to lead independent lives and will fund projects designed to support young people outside the school environment. Applications that demonstrate the involvement of people with learning difficulties and their families, partnership working, a demand for the project and either match funding or active fundraising are more likely to be successful. Grants are usually for up to £5K, awarded annually with deadlines usually in March.

 

Mrs Smith and Mount Trust. The Mount Fund
https://mrssmithandmounttrust.org/the-mount-fund/

The Mount Fund aims to assist disadvantaged people towards greater independence or a better quality of life. Priorities include learning difficulty. Grants are usually between £3000-10,000, some repeated. Grants are for organisations with income under £1million. Grants are given for projects, general running costs/core funding, salaries, advice services, furnishings/equipment, organisational development. Trustees meet 3 times per year.

 

The Will Charitable Trust
www.willcharitabletrust.org.uk

The Trust provides financial assistance to charities with priorities including long term day/employment activities for people with learning difficulties. Grants vary in amount, but generally fall within the range of £5,000 to £20,000, and are usually one-off annual grants. They prefer to fund individual projects but may fund core running costs under exceptional circumstances. Applications are to be submitted between November and January, with decisions made in April.

 

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Funders with specific interest in mental health

This section identifies funders who will fund specific work relating to mental health. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority, or other sections on specific service areas.

Allen Lane Foundation
www.allenlane.org.uk

Grants of £5-15K(average £5650) for up to 3 years for organisations with income up to £100,000 (unless national organisations). Their priorities include mental health (but not disability).

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

The Drapers’ Charitable Fund
www.thedrapers.co.uk

Award grants of up to £15,000 (although larger ones have been given), to improve the quality of life and expectations of people and their communities through education and social welfare, particularly in Greater London, with disability as one of their priorities. Their focus is on adults with less visible impairments including mental health. Priority is given to charities operating nationally or regionally rather than locally.

The awards committee meets five times a year and applications are accepted throughout the year.

 

Garfield Weston
https://garfieldweston.org/

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. Their priority themes include health and welfare (and mental health projects have been funded under these)
The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

The Livery and Freemen Fund
www.merchant-taylors.co.uk/livery-freeman-fund-2/

The LFF is the grant-awarding arm of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, incorporating Consolidated Charities for the Infirm (CCI), which has mental health as one of their priorities. They support registered charities for up to three years, with preference given to work in Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Hackney. They will not fund medical research, core funding or building costs, but applications for seed funding are particularly welcome. Preference is given to funding discrete projects with defined outcomes. They generally have 4 nominated charities they support at any one time, but do also give some other donations.

 

The Rayne Foundation
http://www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people.We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria.We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.

 

Mrs Smith and Mount Trust. The Mount Fund
https://mrssmithandmounttrust.org/the-mount-fund/

The Mount Fund aims to assist disadvantaged people towards greater independence or a better quality of life. Priorities include mental health. Grants are usually between £3000-10,000, some repeated. Grants are for organisations with income under £1million Smaller charities with income of up to £500,000 could be considered for larger grants of up to £20,000 paid over 2 or more years under the mental health category. Grants are given for projects, general running costs/core funding, salaries, advice services, furnishings/equipment, organisational development. Trustees meet 3 times per year.

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Funders with specific interest in sensory impairment

The Inman Charity
http://www.inmancharity.org/

Grants of £3-5K are awarded to registered charities, with priorities including charities supporting people with sensory impairments. They particularly like to support specific projects and do not offer grants to individuals. There are two rounds of funding awarded each year – applications must be received by the end of February or the end of August each year.

The Livery and Freemen Fund
www.merchant-taylors.co.uk/livery-freeman-fund-2/

The LFF is the grant-awarding arm of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, incorporating Consolidated Charities for the Infirm (CCI), which includes “sensory disabilities” as a priority. They support registered charities for up to three years, with preference given to work in Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Hackney. They will not fund medical research, core funding or building costs, but applications for seed funding are particularly welcome. Preference is given to funding discrete projects with defined outcomes. They generally support about 4 nominated charities at any one time but do also give other smaller donations.

The Ulverscroft Foundation
http://www.foundation.ulverscroft.com

We support projects that help visually impaired people. In general we will not fund staff salaries or ongoing running costs for an organisation. Staffing costs for specific, time-limited projects may be considered at the Trustees’ discretion.  Research projects which involve salary costs may also be considered. Trustees meet quarterly and applications are accepted by email or letter

The Will Charitable Trust
www.willcharitabletrust.org.uk

The Trust provides financial assistance to charities with priorities including visual impairment. Grants vary in amount, but generally fall within the range of £5,000 to £20,000, and are usually one-off annual grants. They prefer to fund individual projects but may fund core running costs under exceptional circumstances.

Applications are to be submitted between November and January, with decisions made in April.

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Funders with specific interest in support for children and young people

This section identifies funders who will fund specific children and young people’s support. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

BBC Children in Need
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b008dk4b/features/grants

Main Grants programme is open to charities and not-for-profit organisations applying for grants over £10,000 per year for up to three years. They also have a small grants programme for under 10,000. Support for under 18s. Disability amongst priorities.

 

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

City Bridge Trust Bridging Divides. Postive Transitions
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/positive-transitions/

We want applications on this programme to achieve at least one of the following outcomes:

  • Londoners experiencing inequality or disadvantage are supported to become more independent.
  • Vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners are more resilient and empowered to make positive choices.
  • Specialist support services are better able to meet the needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged Londoners.

Disabled Children and young people transitioning into adulthood and children with mental health needs are among the priorities. They specifically state they are committed to the social model of disability and want to support work that removes the barriers, physical or otherwise, that prevent disabled people and older people from participating in society and living independently. They welcome applications from Deaf and Disabled People’s Organisations. They welcome applications for up to 5 years funding and core funding will be considered.

 

Country Landowners Charitable Trust
https://www.cla.org.uk/events/cla-charitable-trust

The CLA Charitable Trust provides education, recreation and facilities in the countryside for Disabled people, particularly the young. Its priorities include education about the countryside for young people from towns and cities, and the provision of facilities for (young) Disabled people to visit and participate in learning experiences about the countryside.

Grants average at around £2K. Applications welcome throughout the year from small charities.

 

DM Thomas Foundation for Young People
https://dmthomasfoundation.org/what-we-do/grants/

The DMT Foundation accepts applications for its Central Grants Scheme from registered charities in the UK. Applications working in the area of education or health with one of their chosen focus groups will be considered (Disabled children are one of priority groups).
Applications for up to £5000 are approved by their Director, up to £10,000 by their Grants Committee and £10,000 plus by their Trustees (quarterly). Maximum awarded is usually £30K per year.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes Disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under several themes, one of which is transition (including training, development and employment support). They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Esmee Fairbairn
http://esmeefairbairn.org.uk/

Have a broad range of priorities including education. Interested in improving support for disadvantaged young people, improving the rights of vulnerable children and young people, addressing root causes of low attainment and challenging behaviour, empowering young leaders. Will give multi-year funding and will fund core costs.

 

Field Family Charitable Trust
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

Usually about £3K grants to organisations with income less than £1million. Some repeated grants. Improving the quality of life and prospects of vulnerable 13-25 year olds in London is amongst their priorities. Grant decisions are made twice per year. Usually give funding for running costs, helplines or equipment.

 

Garfield Weston
https://garfieldweston.org/

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. Their priority themes include education and youth with trustees particularly keen to see applications from the Youth sectors and also in regions of economic disadvantage.
The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

Heathrow Community Fund http://www.airportcommunitiestrust.com/community-funds/heathrow-community-fund

Projects for Young People invites grant applications from organisations working on projects that give young people new skills help them into employment, raise aspirations or increase resilience. Grants of up to £25,000 per year for up to two years are available for charities, voluntary groups and Community Interest Companies. We support significant and positive improvement in quality of life for communities near the airport and so eligible London boroughs are Ealing, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Richmond

 

The Hedley Foundation
http://www.hedleyfoundation.org.uk

Awards grants averaging £3000 to small charities working with young people (11-25) in the areas of recreation, sport, training, health and welfare. One of their priority groups is Disabled and terminally ill young people, who they support through funding for specialist equipment and respite breaks and holidays; the foundation also supports young carers. They do not fund core costs. Trustees meet every two months and applications are welcome throughout the year.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Holiday Grants for Children
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Holiday Grants for Children – One-off short grants of £500 – £2,500 towards recreational trips and holidays for groups of children aged 13 and under who are disabled or disadvantaged, with priority given to the 20% most deprived areas in the UK.

 

Hilden Charitable Trust
http://www.hildencharitablefund.org.uk/

The Hilden Charitable Fund priorities for grants in the UK include for community based initiatives for disadvantaged young people aged 16 to 25. Applications by form available on their website.

 

John Lyons Charity
http://www.johnlyonscharity.org.uk/grants/

Gives grants to benefit children and young people up to the age of 25 who live in nine boroughs in northwest London: Barnet, Brent, Camden, Ealing, Hammersmith & Fulham, Harrow, Kensington & Chelsea and the Cities of London and Westminster.  Programme Areas highlight the areas in which we are able to support projects. These range from Education & Learning, Arts & Science to Sports and Emotional Wellbeing, as a few examples. These are not fixed and are designed to be flexible so that we can meet the ever changing needs of children and young people in our Beneficial Area. We are constantly looking to see if we can expand on these areas. Grants average £20,000 for an enormous range of services for young people, including youth clubs, arts projects, counselling, child care and parental support schemes, sports and academic bursaries and scholarships.

 

Kelly Family Trust
http://www.kfct.org.uk/

Small grants £1-5K for projects/organisations that support whole families. Can be for capital or revenue.

 

Les Mills Fund for Children
https://lesmillsfundforchildren.org.uk/ourwork/

The fund supports various projects which work with children (including Disabled children) aged 0-16 to promote and encourage healthy lifestyles and active lives. Grants are for up to £1000. Funding deadlines are every 4 months.

 

Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust
http://www.margaretdobsontrust.btck.co.uk

The Margaret Dobson Further Education Trust supports organisations working with young adults aged 18 to 25 years with a learning difficulties who are leaving formal education. The Trust aims to give these young people the practical skills needed to prepare them to be able to lead independent lives and will fund projects designed to support young people outside the school environment. Applications that demonstrate the involvement of people with learning difficulties and their families, partnership working, a demand for the project and either match funding or active fundraising are more likely to be successful.

Grants are usually for up to £5K, awarded annually with deadline usually in March.

 

Masonic Charitable Foundation
https://mcf.org.uk/charities

This foundation’s current focus includes creating the best chances in the early years. Large Grants are available to organistions with income over £500K. These grants are between £10K and £150K but the average grant ranges between 20-80K. These can be for up to 3 years. Grant amounts should not exceed over 15% of the total income of the charity.
Smaller charities can apply for Community Support Small Grants between £500 and £5000.
There are several deadlines throughout the year. See website for details.

 

Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Youth Fund
https://www.phf.org.uk/funds/youth-fund/

The Youth Fund supports organisations whose main purpose is about helping young people (aged 14-25) in the most precarious positions, where making the transition to adult independence is most challenging. The Fund supports organisations which work with young people experiencing disadvantage in a way that recognises and builds on their strengths and potential – we refer to this as an asset-based approach. Such approaches can include ‘strengths-based’, ‘advantaged thinking’, or ‘asset-based community development’ practices.
Organisations may be planning to grow their impact by:
• Replicating a programme or service
• Widening the reach of an idea or innovation
• Spreading a technology or skill
• Advancing policy or enhancing its implementation
• Influencing attitudes
The Fund will provide core funding to organisations within the youth sector and outside. Applications are accepted throughout the year. Grants are usually for up to 2 years totalling £30-£60K.

 

Peabody Community Fund – Administered through London Community Foundation
https://londoncf.org.uk/grants/peabody-community-fund

The Fund exists to support projects and activities designed to improve the quality of life of Peabody residents and the wider community. Projects must align with one or more of the three fund themes:
• Healthy – helping people with their physical and mental wellbeing
• Happy – helping people make the most out of their lives through active citizenship, volunteering and community involvement
• Wealthy – supporting people to become financially independent through employment, enterprise and education

The fund is able to support ongoing/regular activities who must primarily be Peabody residents. Priority will be given to:
• Organisations/projects addressing the needs of the most disadvantaged members of the community
• Peabody resident-led projects. If an applicant organisation is not resident-led, they will need to demonstrate strong connections with local residents, strong partnership working in the locality, a commitment to the locality after the proposed project is complete, and a clear understanding of community needs
Youth-led projects up to the age of 24
• There will also be restricted funds for projects supporting Peabody residents living in Waltham Forest and Thamesmead (on the Bexley/Greenwich boroughs border)

Grants are available covering costs relating to your proposed project, and groups can request:
• Grants of up to £10,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £20,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income of £250,000 or less.
• Grants of up to £15,000 per year over 2 years (maximum request of £30,000 in total) for organisations with an annual income between £250,001 and £500,000.

There are two deadlines per year in July and December.

 

Percy Bilton Charity
http://www.percybiltoncharity.org.uk/

Capital grants for up to £5K. Priorities include disability and disadvantaged youth.

 

The Peter Cruddas Foundation
http://www.petercruddasfoundation.org.uk/

The Foundation gives priority to programmes designed to help disadvantaged and disengaged young people in the age range of 16 to 30, to pursue pathways to Education, Training and Employment with the ultimate aim of helping them to become financially independent. Funding streams include for youth work in London particularly evening work for disadvantaged young people aged 16 to 30. Registered charities in England and Wales can apply (currently not CIC’s or Social Enterprises). There is no minimum or maximum in terms of the size of grant that organisations can apply for, and projects can be funded for more than one year.

 

Rank Foundation- Pebble Grants
http://www.rankfoundation.com

Our aim is to improve the lives of people and their communities, across the UK. We look to do this by encouraging and developing leadership and promoting enterprise and innovation. Pebble Grants is our small funding stream for UK registered charities which are raising money for projects where the total cost is less than £1million. If you are raising money for a one-off short-term activity (such as an annual respite break or holiday for disadvantaged young people) and have already raised a third of the total costs, you may be eligible for this. Organisations must have income less than £500,000 and the usual donated amount is £1000.

 

The Rayne Foundation
http://www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people
    We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria.We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.


True Colours Trust
http://www.truecolourstrust.org.uk/small-grants-uk/

Small grants up to 10K. Recently funded projects are: siblings and young carers groups, bereavement support, minibuses, multisensory rooms, play equipment, hydrotherapy pools

 

Youth Music
http://network.youthmusic.org.uk/

Funding for music related projects. They have priorities for children facing challenges (including disability)

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Funders with specific interest in support for older people

This section identifies funders who will fund specific older people’s support. You should also look at the list of funders with disability as a priority.

 

Allen Lane Foundation
www.allenlane.org.uk

Grants of £5-15K(average £5650) for up to 3 years for organisations with income up to £100,000 (unless national organisations). Their priorities include the elderly (but not disability).

 

Barchester Healthcare Foundation
http://www.bhcfoundation.org.uk

This is a grant-giving charity that helps older people and Disabled adults (18+) to lead more fulfilled lives. The foundation’s focus is on connecting or re-connecting people with others in their local community, helping combat isolation and loneliness and enabling people to be active. Funding of between £100 and £5,000 is available for small community groups to help improve people’s mobility, independence and quality of life.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

Dunhill Medical Trust
http://dunhillmedical.org.uk/grants-for-community-based-organisations/

We make grants to UK charities and community-based organisations who provide care, activities and services for older people.  We particularly like to support projects that have the potential to “scale up”, share resources and experience with others and attract other sources of support. There are two funding rounds per year.

We award project grants for between £5000-£40,000 over a maximum of 3 years

Capital grants of £5000-£100,000 are awarded for developments in the built environment for older people to enhance and maintain their health, well-being and independence and/or specific pieces of equipment or furnishings which can be used for the care and support of individuals (for example, installation of a hearing loop system). Priority will be given to care facilities which are focused specifically on older people and where it has not been possible to obtain the necessary funding from statutory organisations. Organisations are expected to secure at least 50% of cost from other funding sources.

 

Field Family Charitable Trust
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

Usually about £3K grants to organisations with income less than £1million. Some repeated grants. Improving the quality of life and prospects of older people is amongst their priorities. Usually give funding for running costs, helplines or equipment.

 

First Utility Foundation
http://www.first-utility-foundation.org.uk/

The First Utility Foundation is a charitable trust funded and created by First Utility, the UK’s largest independent energy supplier. It supports projects that make a genuine difference to the lives of families and individuals across the UK by awarding grants to charitable schemes that can deliver real improvements to people’s quality of life. It specifically supports projects that improve the lives of older people and Disabled people.

To be eligible for funding, charities must preferably have a turnover of between £50k and £5m. There are two categories of financial grants available:

  • General Support grants: These grants specifically cover an organisation’s core costs (generally between £3,000 and £10,000 per year)
  • Flagship grants: These larger scale grants contribute to a specific initiative or project. These are valued at up to £20,000 per year.

See website for more details.

 

The Inman Charity
http://www.inmancharity.org/

Grants of £3-5K are awarded to registered charities, with priorities including care of the elderly. They particularly like to support specific projects and do not offer grants to individuals. There are two rounds of funding awarded each year – applications must be received by the end of February or the end of August each year.

 

Masonic Charitable Foundation
https://mcf.org.uk/charities

This foundation’s current focus includes working to reduce loneliness and isolation in later life by supporting disadvantaged and vulnerable people over 50 years. Large Grants are available to organisations with income over £500K. These grants are between £10K and £150K but the average grant ranges between 20-80K. These can be for up to 3 years. Grant amounts should not exceed over 15% of the total income of the charity.
Smaller charities can apply for Community Support Small Grants between £500 and £5000.
There are several deadlines throughout the year. See website for details

 

Percy Bilton Charity
http://www.percybiltoncharity.org.uk/

Capital grants for up to £5K. Priorities include older people

 

The Rayne Foundation
http://www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people.We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria.We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.

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Grants for Individuals

Access to Work
https://www.gov.uk/access-to-work

Funding for individuals in work to provide support/equipment etc required to enable them to carry out their job.

Aspire
https://www.aspire.org.uk/how-to-apply-for-a-grant

Aspire is a national charity that provides practical help to people who have been paralysed by spinal cord injury. The charity provides grants to assist with the purchase of specialised equipment such as lightweight or powered wheelchairs, power assisted wheels and assistive computer technology. The grants programme is open to anyone living in the UK or Ireland who has a spinal cord injury.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

Axis Foundation
www.axisfoundation.org

This is the charitable arm of Axis. Each year, the company donates a percentage of its profit, via the Axis Foundation, into charitable and community-based projects in the areas it operates, including London. They will fund individuals as well as projects. They offer grants up to £100K, and are willing to consider funding anything that helps improve the lives of underprivileged, vulnerable or Disabled people, including research, education, community projects and equipment. Applications welcome throughout the year.

Barchester Healthcare Foundation
http://www.bhcfoundation.org.uk

This is a grant-giving charity that helps older people and Disabled adults (18+) to lead more fulfilled lives. The foundation’s focus is on connecting or re-connecting people with others in their local community, helping combat isolation and loneliness and enabling people to be active. Funding of between £100 and £5,000 is available for individuals to help improve people’s mobility, independence and quality of life. Individual applications must be completed by a third party sponsor.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Buttle UK
www.buttleuk.org/need-support/young-people#help

Provide financial help to young people aged 16-20 who receive no support from their parents or guardians so that they can further their education or employment. To apply the young person must have a clear education, training or employment goal that they are pursuing or intend to pursue within three months of their application. Buttle UK can provide direct financial support to meet this goal, and also help them to set up home and/or to improve their emotional, mental or physical wellbeing. Each package of support can be worth up to £2,000.

 

Disability Grants
www.disability-grants.org

Disability Grants is a national website helping Disabled people and their families find grants towards specialist equipment, holidays, housing, recreation and education.

It includes details on charities and trusts that provide funding to anyone with a disability including Disabled children, carers and disability groups.

This is a directory website to help you find a funding body that gives grants for individuals, not a grant-awarding body in itself.

Family Fund
http://www.familyfund.org.uk/

The family fund gives grants to families with disabled children, and to 16-17 year old disabled young people (this includes children and young people.

Florence Nightingale Aid in Sickness Trust
http://fnaist.org.uk/

Provide funding for medical items and services to improve quality of life of Disabled people (all ages). Includes wheelchairs, riser chairs, white goods, communication aids, sensory equipment, computers and software. Does not include car adaptations or stairlifts. Applications welcome throughout the year through third parties such as advice providers.

The Headley Trust
http://www.sfct.org.uk/the-headley-trust/

The Headley Trust is one of the Sainsbury family charitable trusts. Its activities include a small grants programme that provides funding for practical aids for Disabled people aged 16 and above.  Grants are considered up to £2,500 to help Disabled people purchase equipment that will help increase their mobility.

Applications can only be made via an online form (bottom of page of link above). Each applicant must be referred by a third party such as a registered charity, medical professional, social care worker or Citizens Advice Bureau.

Applications can be for, but not limited to, the following:  specially adapted computer systems, communication aids, wheelchairs, electric scooters and stair-lifts. In most cases, any grant award will be for no more than half the total cost of the equipment and will be released via the referring organisation when funds to meet the total cost have been raised.  Grants will be available for one year from the date of approval.

 

Independence at Home
http://www.independenceathome.org.uk

Independence at Home is a national charity that helps improve independence, comfort, safety, dignity and quality of life for Disabled people of all ages who are in financial need. They can help towards the cost of adaptations, equipment or other things that are not available from public funds, including home adaptations, house repairs and other building work, as well as other special equipment such as stair lifts, special beds, riser-recliner chairs etc. They are also able to help towards the cost of heating homes in winter. Applications can be submitted at any time.

 

Mobility Trust
www.mobilitytrust.org.uk

The Mobility Trust provides powered wheelchairs and scooters for people who have severe impairments. This includes helping to organise medical assessments, arrange purchase, delivery and insurance, and follow up any problems.The trust will only give grants to those who have suitable storage for a powered wheelchair or scooter and cannot get one through the Motability scheme. Applications welcome throughout the year, initially by either letter or telephone call. Details are on the website.

The Paul Bush Foundation Trust
www.bushco.co.uk/the-paul-bush-foundation-trust/

Supports individuals with an acquired physical disability as the result of an accident or a birth injury. Funds are awarded to both individuals and organisations. Individuals may apply for grants between £100 – £5000 for specialist equipment, technology and holiday support, services and provision; the trustees favour small-scale one-off requests that show immediate evidence of improving the quality of life of a Disabled person.

The trustees meet twice yearly in April and October.

Paul Hamlyn Foundation Ideas and Pioneers Fund
https://www.phf.org.uk/funds/ideaspioneers/#about-the-ideas-and-pioneers-fund

The Ideas and Pioneers Fund supports people with unusual or radical ideas to improve the life chances and opportunities of people in the UK. Grants of up to £10,000 (and up to £15,000 in exceptional circumstances) are available, including to individuals over 18.

The Fund supports people who have an idea in its early stages of development. We will consider funding work to enable you to develop the idea from concept to set-up: this may include problem definition and analysis, scoping, exploratory work, and prototyping.
We are looking for new, radical and innovative ideas which contribute to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation’s wider commitment to help people realise their full potential. Find out more about PHF’s mission and values here. We also have a particular interest in supporting ideas that are about using technology in innovative ways to tackle social issues.
We prefer to be the first and main funder to support your idea. The key qualities that we look for in pioneers are passion, commitment and resilience. You will be able to demonstrate experience and understanding of the issue/ social change you are seeking to address.

 

Prince’s Trust Development Awards
https://www.princes-trust.org.uk/help-for-young-people/get-funding-train-learn

Awards for 16-30 year olds living in the UK, studying less than 14 hours per week or not in compulsory education, unemployed or working less than 16 hours per week.

You can get support with things like accredited course fees up to Level 3 (A level equivalent), tools or equipment or uniform for a job or qualification; job related license fees; transport to a new job until first pay cheque.

It can take up to eight weeks for us to process the application. Once approved, you’ll be awarded a typical amount of £175-£250 (depending on your needs, location and funding availability) which is paid directly to an organisation or we’ll send you a voucher.

 

Prince’s Trust Enterprise Programme
https://www.princes-trust.org.uk/help-for-young-people/support-starting-business

18-30 year olds with a business idea can receive training and support to start your own business including start-up business finance (low interest loans of up to £5K) and support from an experienced business mentor.

 

The Mrs Smith and Mount Trust- The Mrs Smith Fund
https://mrssmithandmounttrust.org/the-mrs-smith-fund/

The fund aims to assist disadvantaged people towards greater independence and better quality of life. Registered charities can apply to the Mrs Smith Fund for a block grant to distribute hardship funding to individuals in need. Priority groups include Disabled people who are returning home after being in residential settings or hospital; people who are being rehoused due to circumstances beyond their control; people being rehabilitated who are on benefits. Grants under this programme are only made once a year. Registered charities who think they could be eligible must supply a one page document providing initial details about their work. If appropriate they will then be sent an application form when the Trustees are due to consider the next round of funding (once a year).

 

Skills for Care
www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Funding/Individual-employer-funding/Individual-employer-funding.aspx

Funding for individuals who employ their own PA s so they can improve the training and skills of the PAs they employ.

 

Turn To Us
https://grants-search.turn2us.org.uk/

Run a grants directory to search for grants for individuals

 

Unltd
https://unltd.org.uk/

Provide a range of support programmes and grants to individual social entrepreneurs who are setting up, or trying to grow, ventures which have a social impact.

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