Funders with disability amongst their priorities

Funders with disability amongst their priorities.

In this section:

 

Grants over £10k

Axis Foundation
www.axisfoundation.org

This is the charitable arm of Axis. Each year, the company donates a percentage of its profit, via the Axis Foundation, into charitable and community-based projects in the areas it operates, including London.

They will fund both community projects and individuals within these areas. They offer grants up to £100K, and are willing to consider funding anything that helps improve the lives of underprivileged, vulnerable or Disabled people, including research, education, community projects and equipment.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

City Bridge Trust Bridging Divides
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/

City Bridge Trust are funding three strands of work: Connecting the Capital; Positive Transitions; Advice and Support. It is worth looking at all of these strands. In all strands, their priorities include supporting Londoners facing inequality and disadvantage

 

The Drapers’ Charitable Fund
http://www.thedrapers.co.uk/Charities/Grant-making-trusts/The-Drapers-Charitable-Fund.aspx

Award grants of up to £15,000 (although larger ones have been given), to improve the quality of life and expectations of people and their communities through education and social welfare, particularly in Greater London, with Disability as one of their priorities. Their focus is on adults with less less visible impairments (including sensory impairment, mental health and learning difficulties); they do not services for people with physical impairments or medical conditions, or children’s services. Priority is given to charities operating nationally or regionally rather than locally.

The awards committee meets five times a year and applications are accepted throughout the year.

 

DM Thomas Foundation for Young People
https://dmthomasfoundation.org/what-we-do/grants/

The DMT Foundation accepts applications for its Central Grants Scheme from registered charities in the UK. Applications working in the area of education or health with one of their chosen focus groups will be considered. These include; Disabled children and young people; children and young people who are in hospital and children and young people who require palliative care.

Applications for grants over £10,000 are considered by their Trustees quarterly. Maximum grants are usually £30K per year.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under 4 themes of health and wellbeing (which includes advice and information), independent living at home; breaks for carers; and transition (including training, development and employment support).
They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Feminist Review Trust
http://www.feminist-review-trust.com

Grants of up to £15K made to projects that support women, with Disabled women and girls as a priority. Funding is available to help with training and development projects, one-off events, start up activities and core funding.

There are three funding rounds each year for 2017 and 2018, with applications for each round to be received by the end of January, April and September.

 

First Utility Foundation
http://www.first-utility-foundation.org.uk/

The First Utility Foundation is a charitable trust funded and created by First Utility, the UK’s largest independent energy supplier. It supports projects that make a genuine difference to the lives of families and individuals across the UK by awarding grants to charitable schemes that can deliver real improvements to people’s quality of life. It specifically supports projects that improve the lives of Disabled people, older people and families. To be eligible for funding, charities must preferably have a turnover of between £50k and £5m. Their ‘Flagship’ grant programme which contributes to specific initiatives and project provides grants of up to £20,000 per year. See website for more details.

 

Garfield Weston
http://www.garfieldweston.org

The Foundation supports organisations of all sizes, where need is greatest. Some of the priority areas are arts, education, youth, community, environment, health and welfare and the trustees are particularly keen to see applications from charities in the Welfare, Youth and Community sectors and also in regions of economic disadvantage. Projects supporting Disabled people have been funded through their welfare and health strands
The common theme in charities is that they are meeting a need effectively with clear outcomes and benefits, good leadership, sensible business plans and a commitment to excellence.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Improving Lives Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

They do not fund new work. They only fund work that is proven and effective (either from evidence of your previous delivery, proven by independent research, or if you are delivering a service for the first time-clearly evidenced as effective elsewhere).

This grant programmes is focused on 6 key priority themes:
Helping people rebuild their lives following critical moment, crisis, trauma or abuse
Helping people make positive choices (including rehabilitation support, reduction in negative behaviours, improved ability to cope)
Enabling people to work towards or maintain accomodation/housing
Training and support to move towards employment
Financial inclusion, rights and entitlements (including information and advice, support to navigate systems and claim entitlements, improving financial literacy)
Improving family and social support networks

Grants are for £20-60K per year over one to three years for small and medium sized organisations (£50K to £2m) to support running costs, salaries and projects. They won’t give funding that represents over 50% of an organisation’s overall running costs

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Strengthening Communities Programme
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Henry Smith will support charities and not-for-profit organisations, including social enterprises. They are interested in organisations that are true to a clear mission, responsive to need and well placed to deliver, working to create lasting change, monitoring impact and using that to improve services, providing direct and person centred support with people meaningfully involved in finding solutions to issues they face, providing holistic support, well run and using resources well.

As well as organisational characteristics above, for this programme they want organisations to be community led (recognising that the best solutions to problems are rooted in their community) and who are committed to equlity of opportunity and removing barriers to marginalised groups. They are interested in people from across the community being able to participate in activities that improve connectedness, opportunities and wellbeing; people who are excluded, vulnerable, or facing other forms of hardship having access to community based services that support positive change; and creating a stronger, active and more engaged community.

Strengthening Communities Grants are for small community-based organisations (£20-500K), working within the 10% most deprived areas of the UK. Awards of £20-60K per year over one to three years can support running costs (including salaries), project costs and small capital costs.

 

John Ellerman Foundation
http://ellerman.org.uk/

We aim to advance the wellbeing of people, society and the natural world by focusing on the arts, environment and social action. We believe these areas, both separately and together, can make an important contribution to wellbeing. Under the Social Action strand, we aim to help create a society where all can thrive, by supporting organisations which work to create positive changes in practice, systems and institutions. Interested in work which improves systems and institutions through policy, advocacy and campaigning, and actively involves those with personal experience of the issue tackled. They tend to fund small to medium sized organisations with a national reach. Organisations much have income between £100,000 and £10million. Grants for their social action strand are about £30-40K per year for up to 3 years.

 

Leathersellers Company
http://www.leathersellers.co.uk/

Have a small and large grants programme. Priorities include disability. They will fund specific projects but will also give multi-year unrestricted awards for core costs.

 

The Livery and Freemen Fund
www.merchant-taylors.co.uk/livery-freeman-fund-2/

The LFF is the grant-awarding arm of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, incorporating Consolidated Charities for the Infirm (CCI), which has physical or sensory disabilities and mental health as priorities. They support registered charities for up to three years, with preference given to work in Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Hackney. They will not fund medical research, core funding or building costs, but applications for seed funding are particularly welcome. Preference is given to funding discrete projects with defined outcomes. They fund usually about 4 nominated charities at a time, giving smaller donations to others.

 

London Catalyst
http://www.londoncatalyst.org.uk/

Large grants (3-20K) for organisations with income up to £1million. Priorities include disability and they like user led organisations

 

National Lottery Community Fund – Reaching Communities
https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/funding/programmes/reaching-communities-england

Reaching Communities make grants of over £10,000 in England, supporting organisations with great ideas that enable communities to thrive. Funding priorities are to:
• bring people together and build strong relationships in and across communities
• improve the places and spaces that matter to communities
• enable more people to fulfil their potential by working to address issues at the earliest possible stage.

Grants are awarded for up to five years, for project activities, operating costs, organisational development and capital costs. Through all our funding, we’re interested in supporting organisations that are:
• people led – meaningfully involving the people you’re working with in the development and delivery of your activity
• strengths based – making the most of the skills that already exist in communities
• connected – understanding what other relevant organisations are doing and developing good working relationships.

People’s Health Trust
http://www.peopleshealthtrust.org.uk

Funding between £5 and £25,000 for projects tacking health inequalities (organizations with income less than £350K). They focus on different geographical areas at different times, so check their map to see if they are funding your area currently.

 

People’s Postcode Trust
http://www.postcodetrust.org.uk/applying-for-a-grant

People’s Postcode Trust funds projects in Great Britain of up to 12 months in length, with grants up to £20K (Unregistered organisations can apply for small grants under £2K). Projects are programmes of work which are limited in scope and seek to achieve particular outcomes focused on one of the funds priorities. These priorities don’t specifically include disability but do include promoting human rights, combatting discrimination and preventing poverty. There are 2 funding rounds per year-see website for dates.

 

The Rayne Foundation
www.raynefoundation.org.uk

The Rayne Foundation makes grants to not-for-profit organisations across the UK tackling a variety of social issues. We will consider applications in the fields of arts, health and wellbeing, education in its widest sense, and those that cover social issues. Our focus is to connect communities, building bridges between marginalised groups and mainstream society, and to enable individuals to reach their full potential. Within these broad criteria, we have a number of areas of special interest:

  • Young people’s improved mental health;
  • Arts as a tool to achieve social change;
  • Improved quality of life for carers and for older people.
    We particularly welcome applications addressing these issues but will consider applications in other subjects which meet our broader criteria. We favour organisations and projects which could change the way issues are tackled in our society and which could have lessons for others beyond the funded organisation. The organisations we fund will be experts in their field. The organisations we fund will be able to explain why they believe their activities will lead to positive change for users and how they will gather evidence to demonstrate this. We want to see that funded organisations are well governed and managed, that they have good finance and risk management systems, and that they have the necessary skills and expertise to deliver their objectives. We prefer to fund work which brings clear and direct benefits to vulnerable and disadvantaged people. This means that we are more likely to fund front-line organisations and will only fund second-tier or research organisations for projects which have a demonstrable benefit to end users.
    We target our funding towards issues and organisations which do not enjoy widespread public support. Our grants typically fall in the range of £10,000 – £20,000 per annum for up to three years. We prefer to fund alongside others as we are unlikely to be able to fund your project in full. We will also consider the size of your request relative to your overall turnover. Small, newer organisations in particular are unlikely to receive a larger grant from us if that would equate to more than 10% of total income, unless it is towards and organisation’s first paid post.


Sport Relief Dispossessed Fund
(managed by London Community Foundation)
http://www.londoncf.org.uk/grants/sport-relief-dispossessed-fund.aspx

Grants up to £20,000 for organizations with income less than £250,000. Range of priorities relating to poverty (see website for details) Annual deadline. Usually May.

 

Thompson Family Charitable Trust

Provides grants to registered charities for general charitable purposes across the UK, with preference shown for charities in the London area. Most grants awarded are between £1K and £50K, with health and social welfare among their priorities. Repeat awards are not uncommon.

The trust does not have a website or a formal application form: for more information / to apply contact Katie Woodward, The Thompson Family Charitable Trust, Hillsdown Court, 15 Totteridge Common, London, N20 8LR.

 

Trust for London
https://www.trustforlondon.org.uk

Trust for London is an independent charitable foundation tackling poverty and inequality in the capital; they are particularly interested in new and imaginative ways of addressing the root causes of London’s social problems, especially where it has the potential to influence and change policy, practice and public attitudes, and targeted towards groups of people who are more likely to be affected by poverty and inequality, with disability as one of their priorities.

Their new funding guidelines fall under seven categories: Good Homes and Neighbourhoods, Better Work, Decent Living Standards, Shared Wealth, Pathways to Settlement, Stronger Voices, and Connected Communities. See website for more details on each.There is no minimum or maximum size of grant but the average will be around £80K in total over one to three years. They are unlikely to award grants over £150K. They have three deadlines for applications per year-see website for dates

 

Trusthouse Charitable Foundation
http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk

Grants to small, well-established organisations in the UK with annual income under £500K, who address local issues in areas of extreme urban deprivation. Grants can be for running costs or one off capital costs. Particular interests include community support, arts and education, and Disabled people are named as a priority. Their urban grants are only for projects in urban areas classified in the latest government Indices of Multiple Deprivation as being in the lowest 20%. Applications can be made at any time.

Small grants are usually decided within 6 weeks. These are grants of between £2-7.5K and 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere (small grants are only available to organisations with income under £250K).

Large grants go to quarterly Committee meetings in January, April, July and November. These range from single year grants from £7500 to multi year grants of up to 20K per year. 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere.

 

Tudor Trust
http://tudortrust.org.uk/what-we-do/about-our-grants/

Grants for one, two or three years, usually for over £10K available for core funding, projects, capital, or organisational development. Their focus is on smaller groups (turnover of less than £1million, and usually less that £500K) embedded in their communities, which work directly with people who are on the edges of mainstream society in ways which encourage inclusion, integration and independence. They are particularly interested in work that supports the most marginalised – individuals and communities with limited access to resources and opportunities – to develop and promote social connections and relationships, to improve the well-being of individuals and strengthen communities. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

The Will Charitable Trust
www.willcharitabletrust.org.uk

The Trust provides financial assistance to charities with priorities including visual impairment and learning difficulties. Grants vary in amount, but generally fall within the range of £5,000 to £20,000, and are usually one-off annual grants. They prefer to fund individual projects but may fund core running costs under exceptional circumstances.

Applications are to be submitted between November and January, with decisions made in April.

 

 

Grants under £10K

 

The ACT Foundation
http://www.theactfoundation.co.uk

The foundation believes disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under 4 themes of health and wellbeing (which includes advice and information), indepdendent living at home; breaks for carers; and transition (including training, development and employment support).
They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Adint Charitable Trust
Mr Douglas Oram, Trustee, The Adint Charitable Trust, Suite 42, 571 Finchley Road, London NW3 7BN.

Grants for health and disability. £5 to £10K

 

The Archer Trust
http://www.archertrust.org.uk

Award grants of £250 – £3,000 to small UK charities to provide aid or support to defined groups, including Disabled people. They prefer to support organisations working in areas of high unemployment and deprivation and favour charities with a volunteer focus. They do not offer grants for conversions for Disabled access. Trustees meet twice a year, normally March and September.

 

Barchester Healthcare Foundation
http://www.bhcfoundation.org.uk

This is a grant-giving charity that helps older people and Disabled adults (18+) to lead more fulfilled lives. The foundation’s focus is on connecting or re-connecting people with others in their local community, helping combat isolation and loneliness and enabling people to be active. Funding of between £100 and £5,000 is available for small community groups to help improve people’s mobility, independence and quality of life.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Boshier Hinton Foundation
http://www.boshierhintonfoundation.org.uk

Small grants up to £2K for organizations supporting Disabled people.

 

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for services and equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

City Bridge Trust Small Grants
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/connecting-the-capital/small-grants/

City Bridge Trust are offering small grants of up to £10,000 over 12 months to organisations with an annual income of less than £75,000 for projects which enable disabled people and/or older people who are disadvantaged to actively participate in the arts, sports and health and well-being opportunities, and for projects which bring communities together to improve their local environment

DD McPhail Charitable Settlement
Contact Mrs Sheila Watson PO Box 285 Pinner HA5 3FB

Usually grants up to £2K. Priorities include disability

 

DM Thomas Foundation for Young People
https://dmthomasfoundation.org/what-we-do/grants/

The DMT Foundation accepts applications for its Central Grants Scheme from registered charities in the UK. Applications working in the area of education or health with one of their chosen focus groups will be considered. These include: Disabled children and young people; children and young people who are in hospital and children and young people who require palliative care.

Applications for up to £5000 are approved by their Director and up to £10,000 by their Grants Committee (quarterly).

 

The Drapers’ Charitable Fund
http://www.thedrapers.co.uk/Charities/Grant-making-trusts/The-Drapers-Charitable-Fund.aspx

Award grants of up to £15,000 (although larger ones have been given), to improve the quality of life and expectations of people and their communities through education and social welfare, particularly in Greater London, with disability as one of their priorities. Their focus is on adults with less visible impairments (including sensory impairment, mental health and learning difficulties); they do not services for people with physical impairments or medical conditions, or children’s services. Priority is given to charities operating nationally or regionally rather than locally.

The awards committee meets five times a year and applications are accepted throughout the year.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes Disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under 4 themes of health and wellbeing (which includes advice and information), independent living at home; breaks for carers; and transition (including training, development and employment support).
They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

First Utility Foundation
http://www.first-utility-foundation.org.uk/

The First Utility Foundation is a charitable trust funded and created by First Utility, the UK’s largest independent energy supplier. It supports projects that make a genuine difference to the lives of families and individuals across the UK by awarding grants to charitable schemes that can deliver real improvements to people’s quality of life. It specifically supports projects that improve the lives of Disabled people, older people and families. To be eligible for funding, charities must preferably have a turnover of between £50k and £5m. Their General Support fund provides grants of up to £10,000 per year towards an organisation’s core costs. See website for more details.

 

Foyle Foundation
http://www.foylefoundation.org.uk/

Small grants up to £10K for organisations with less than £100K income.

 

Gannett Foundation
https://www.gannettfoundation.org/newsquest.htm

The foundation is the charitable arm of Gannett Co Inc., owner of the Newsquest Media Group, one of the UK’s largest newspaper publishers. It provides funding to support local organisations in the area where Newsquest operates (including many areas in London), with disability among its priorities.

Grants of £5-10k are made to support projects that take a creative approach and bring lasting benefits to communities served by Newsquest newspapers; they may also consider single events or short-term projects that otherwise meet their criteria. Grants are not given for general appeals or multi-year campaigns.

Applications are invited from organisations within the circulation areas of Newsquest newspapers, and must be made locally by downloading an application form from the newspaper website. Grants are made once a year, in the autumn.


Goldsmiths Company
http://www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk/charity-education/

3K grants. Won’t repeat fund usually. Usually revenue. Have funded core salary costs and admin, or will fund projects.

 

Greggs Foundation
greggsfoundation@greggs.co.uk

Small grants up to £3K. Four Trustee meetings per year.

 

Grocers Charity
http://www.grocershall.co.uk/

Small grants up to £2K for organisations with less than £500K income. Disability is one of priorities.

 

The Hadley Trust
Email: carol@hadleytrust.org

The trust awards grants to registered charities working in social welfare (disability is one of their priorities). Applications can be made in writing or by email at any time to: Carol Biggs, Hadley Trust, Gladsmuir, Hadley Common, Barnet, Hertfordshire, EN5 5QE Tel: 0208 447 4577 Email: carol@hadleytrust.org

 

The Hedley Foundation
http://www.hedleyfoundation.org.uk

Awards grants averaging £3000 to small charities working with young people (11-25) in the areas of recreation, sport, training, health and welfare. One of their priority groups is disabled and terminally ill young people, who they support through funding for specialist equipment and respite breaks and holidays; the foundation also supports young carers. They do not fund core costs.

Trustees meet every two months and applications are welcome throughout the year.

 

The Henry Smith Charity – Holiday Grants for Children
https://www.henrysmithcharity.org.uk

Holiday Grants for Children – One-off short grants of £500 – £2,500 towards recreational trips and holidays for groups of children aged 13 and under who are disabled or disadvantaged, with priority given to the 20% most deprived areas in the UK.

 

Improving Life for Londoners Fund
http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/funds/tfl-cbt

This fund from Trust for London and City Bridge Trust helps organisations based and working in London to deliver projects that will address inequality and lift people out of poverty in the capital: using practical solutions to support people on low incomes; addressing local problems in creative ways; and led by communities that will benefit from the work. Funding is available to organisations using crowdfunding to raise funds. The fund will provide up to 50% of the target (up to a max of £10,000), with projects expected to raise at least the first 25% from the Crowd. Projects to start within three months of reaching their fundraising target, and last a maximum of one year.

 

The Inman Charity
http://www.inmancharity.org/

Grants of £3-5K are awarded to registered charities, with priorities including care of the elderly, general welfare, and Disabled people. They particularly like to support specific projects and do not offer grants to individuals. There are two rounds of funding awarded each year – applications must be received by the end of February or the end of August each year.

 

Lennox and Wyfold Foundation
Mr G Fincham, Lennox and Wyfold Foundation, 15 Suffolk Street, London, SW1Y 4HG Tel: 02036966721

Grants to registered charities in England and Wales. There is no minimum or maximum level of grant. Most grants range from £5,000 to £10,000. Priorities include disability.
Applications may be submitted at any time and are considered twice a year by the Trustees. The Foundation only accepts written applications.

 

The Livery and Freemen Fund
www.merchant-taylors.co.uk/livery-freeman-fund-2/

The LFF is the grant-awarding arm of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, incorporating Consolidated Charities for the Infirm (CCI), which has physical or sensory impairment and mental health as priorities. They support registered charities for up to three years, with preference given to work in Lewisham, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Hackney. They will not fund medical research, core funding or building costs, but applications for seed funding are particularly welcome. Preference is given to funding discrete projects with defined outcomes. They give some small donations, as well as supporting their nominated charities.

 

London Catalyst
http://www.londoncatalyst.org.uk/

Small grants up to £3K for organisations with less than £200K income. Also do larger grants (see large grants section). Priorities include disability and they like user-led organisations.

 

London Community Foundation
http://www.londoncf.org.uk

administer grants for  a range of funders. Get on their email list to keep up to date with opportunities

 

Matthews Wrightson Charitable Trust
Contact John Mills The Old School House, Church Lane, Easton, S021 1EH

Very small grants to charities with income under £250K. Priorities include disability

 

National Lottery Community Fund Grants (used to be Big Lottery) Awards for All
https://www.tnlcommunityfund.org.uk/funding/under10k

National Lottery Awards for All offers funding from £300 to £10,000 to support what matters to people and communities. We will fund organisations with great project ideas that:
• Shape the places and spaces that matter to communities
• Bring more people together and build strong relationships in and across communities
• Enable more people to fulfil their potential by working to address issues at the earliest possible stage

Quick and easy application

 

The Paul Bush Foundation Trust
http://www.bushco.co.uk/the-paul-bush-foundation-trust/

Supports individuals with an acquired physical impairment as the result of an accident or a birth injury. Funds are awarded to both individuals and organisations. Organisational grants of up to £10,000 are awarded to charitable companies that support the needs of individuals through projects, items or services. Preference is given to funding discrete projects with defined outcomes and applications for seed funding are particularly welcome.

The trustees meet twice yearly in April and October.

 

People’s Postcode Trust
http://www.postcodetrust.org.uk/applying-for-a-grant

People’s Postcode Trust funds projects in Great Britain of up to 12 months in length. Unregistered organisations can apply for small grants under £2K (registered charities can apply for larger grants-see section on grants over £10K). Projects are programmes of work which are limited in scope and seek to achieve particular outcomes focused on one of the funds priorities. These priorities don’t specifically include disability but do include promoting human rights, combatting discrimination and preventing poverty. There are 2 funding rounds per year-see website for dates.

 

Rank Foundation- Pebble Grants
http://www.rankfoundation.com

Our aim is to improve the lives of people and their communities, across the UK. We look to do this by encouraging and developing leadership and promoting enterprise and innovation. Pebble Grants is our small funding stream for UK registered charities which are raising money for projects where the total cost is less than £1million. If you are raising money for a particular project for which the mainstay is capital costs (building work, refurbishment or the purchase of long-term equipment) or a one-off short-term activity (such as an annual respite break or holiday for disadvantaged young people) and have already raised a third of the total costs, you may be eligible for this. Organisations must have income less than £500,000 and the usual donated amount is £1000.

 

Robert Kiln Charitable Trust
Contact Mrs S Howell, 15a Bull Plain, Hertford, SG14 1DX.

Up to £2500, but usually £500 to small local charities. They like long term relationship.

 

Sheldon Trust
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

They fund projects to alleviate poverty. Their focus includes disability. They will fund revenue, capital or running costs. Usually about 5K and to organisations with income under £1million

 

Mrs Smith and Mount Trust. The Mount Fund
https://mrssmithandmounttrust.org/the-mount-fund/

The Mount Fund aims to assist disadvantaged people towards greater independence or a better quality of life. Priorities include mental health, learning difficulty and health in the community. Grants are usually between £3000-10,000, some repeated. Grants are for organisations with income under £1million (or up to £500,000 in the health in the community strand). Grants are given for projects, general running costs/core funding, salaries, advice services, furnishings/equipment, organisational development. Trustees meet 3 times per year.

 

Sobell Foundation
http://www.sobellfoundation.org.uk/

Priorities include disability. Small grants.

 

Sylvia Waddiliove Foundation
administered via http://www.pwwsolicitors.co.uk/charity-grants

Priorities include disability and illness. For disability strand, grants are usually given to organisations with income below £500K and grants under 10K. Trustees meet 4 times per year.

 

Thomas Wall Trust
http://www.thomaswalltrust.org.uk

Offers grants of up to £1000 for small registered charities (income less than <£100k) for specific projects or activities serving the educational and social needs of the community. Apply by the end of May or the end of September each year.

 

Trusthouse Charitable Foundation
http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk

Grants to small, well-established organisations in the UK with annual income under £500K, who address local issues in areas of extreme urban deprivation. Grants can be for running costs or one off capital costs. Particular interests include community support, arts and education, and Disabled people are named as a priority. Their urban grants are only for projects in urban areas classified in the latest government Indices of Multiple Deprivation as being in the lowest 20%. Applications can be made at any time.

Small grants are usually decided within 6 weeks. These are grants of between £2-7.5K and 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere (small grants are only available to organisations with income under £250K).

Large grants go to quarterly Committee meetings in January, April, July and November. These range from single year grants from £7500 to multi year grants of up to 20K per year. 50% of the funding has to be secured from elsewhere.

 

Wakefield and Tetley Trust
www.wakefieldtrust.org.uk/

Beneficiaries in Tower Hamlets, Southwark and City of London only. Improving lives of disadvantaged people with limited choice and opportunities, through reducing barriers, encouraging social inclusion and building community. Maximum one year grants. Average award £6,600 and nearly all under £10,000.

 

Woodward Charitable Trust
http://woodwardcharitabletrust.org.uk

The trust awards grants to UK registered charities with an annual income of less than £300k. Disability is among their priorities and they will fund training and rehabilitation projects. They favour small-scale, locally based initiatives, and primarily fund one-off projects, although may consider funding running costs (including core cost and salaries).

Each year, they give around 100 small grants (£100 – £5k) and around five large grants (>£5,000, usually awarded to charities already known to the trustees). Trustees review grant applications twice a year, usually in March and October.

 

Wyseliot Charitable Trust
Applications made in writing to Jonathan Rose, The Wyseliot Charitable Trust, 17 Chelsea Square, London SW3 6LF

Funding available to charitable organisations in the UK for general charitable purposes. There is no maximum level for grants but previous grants have been for between £2,000 and £5,000 and applications can be submitted at any time. Priorities include disability

 

The Yapp Charitable Trust
http://www.yappcharitabletrust.org.uk

Awards grants for running costs and salaries to small registered charities in England and Wales to help sustain their existing work. Funds given only to charitable companies older than three years with a total annual expenditure of less than £40,000, who undertake work with one of the trust’s priority groups – one of which is people with physical impairments, learning difficulties and/or mental health challenges. Grants are only given to core running costs, not new projects, extra services or additional delivery costs, and are normally for a maximum of £3,000 per year, for up to three years. Priority given to charities that improve the lives of marginalised, disadvantaged or isolated people; that work through raising awareness of issues, education and campaigning; and that demonstrate an effective use of volunteers and elements of self sustainability. Applications are considered throughout the year.

 

Capital projects and equipment only

Axis Foundation
www.axisfoundation.org

This is the charitable arm of Axis. Each year, the company donates a percentage of its profit, via the Axis Foundation, into charitable and community-based projects in the areas it operates including London.

They will fund both community projects and individuals within these areas. They offer grants up to £100K, and are willing to consider funding anything that helps improve the lives of underprivileged, vulnerable or Disabled people, including equipment.

Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Bernard Sunley
http://www.bernardsunley.org

Small and large capital grants (up to 25K) for buildings, equipment etc. Quite a range of priorities.

 

Childwick Trust
http://www.childwicktrust.org/

Priorities include disability, mental health, severe illness, all age ranges. Give funds for  equipment. Give grants from £5-30,000.

 

City Bridge Trust. Bridging Divides- Connecting the Capital
https://www.citybridgetrust.org.uk/what-we-do/grant-making/what-we-fund/connecting-the-capital/

Grants to Enable community buildings in London to be more accessible and user-friendly for deaf and disabled people, including those with sensory impairments, learning disabilities and mental health problems.We will fund access audits up to a total value of £5,000. (An

access or eco audit must be carried out by an independent specialist as recommended by the Trust or through our partners Centre for Accessible Environments) Once you have your access audit we can consider capital funding of up to £100,000 towards access improvements. (Applications for capital costs will usually only be considered where the lease on the building has at least 10 years to run).

 

Clothworkers
http://foundation.clothworkers.co.uk/

Small and large capital grants (up to £25K) for buildings, equipment etc. Priorities include disability.

 

Dunhill Medical Trust
http://dunhillmedical.org.uk/grants-for-community-based-organisations/

We make grants to UK charities and community-based organisations who provide care, activities and services for older people.  Capital grants of £5000-£100,000 are awarded for developments in the built environment for older people to enhance and maintain their health, well-being and independence and/or specific pieces of equipment or furnishings which can be used for the care and support of individuals (for example, installation of a hearing loop system). Priority will be given to care facilities which are focused specifically on older people and where it has not been possible to obtain the necessary funding from statutory organisations. Organisations are expected to secure at least 50% of cost from other funding sources.

 

The Edward Gostling Foundation
https://www.edwardgostlingfoundation.org.uk/

The foundation believes Disabled people should have the same choices, quality of life opportunities and aspirations as others. They fund under several themes, one of which is independent living at home – which includes grants for equipment and adaptations.
They have a small grants programme under 10K and large grants programme up to £100K. Applications welcome throughout the year.

 

Independence at Home
http://www.independenceathome.org.uk

Independence at Home is a national charity that helps improve independence, comfort, safety, dignity and quality of life for Disabled people of all ages who are in financial need. They can help towards the cost of adaptations, equipment or other things that are not available from public funds, including home adaptations, house repairs and other building work, as well as other special equipment such as stair lifts, special beds, riser-recliner chairs etc. They are also able to help towards the cost of heating homes in winter. Applications can be submitted at any time.

 

The Lady Neville Charity
www.theskinnerscompany.org.uk/grants-and-trusts/the-lady-neville-charity/

One of the charities under the Skinners’ Company, the Lady Neville charity provides one-off capital grants of £1,000 to grass roots charitable organisations whose total annual income is less than £100,000, and the total project cost is less than £10,000.

Priority is given to communities in The City of London, Camden (particularly Kings Cross), Enfield, Hackney, and Hounslow. They will consider one-off capital grants for non-recurring expenditure items – equipment, an element of capital building works, or funding towards a one-off event that is not part of core activities.

The Committee considers applications twice a year in May and November.

 

The London Marathon Charitable Trust
www.lmct.org.uk

Capital funding towards the creation and refurbishment of high-quality, accessible and affordable facilities that inspire and increase the numbers of people regularly taking part in physical activities. Disabled people and those with health needs are a priority for the fund. Interested in people who are currently physically inactive or have low levels of activity.

Small Capital Grants Programme for grants of £5,000 to £19,999 has a simple one-stage online application process and applicants will be informed of the Trustees’ decision within 16 weeks of submitting an application.

Major Capital Grants Programme for grants of £20,000 to £150,000 has a two-stage online application process with successful applicants invited to submit a detailed Stage 2 application if their Stage 1 proposals meet the programme criteria.

The Trust has a rolling application process with deadlines every 3 months.

 

Percy Bilton Charity
http://www.percybiltoncharity.org.uk/

Capital grants for up to £5K. Priorities include disability.

 

Rank Foundation- Pebble Grants
http://www.rankfoundation.com

Our aim is to improve the lives of people and their communities, across the UK. We look to do this by encouraging and developing leadership and promoting enterprise and innovation. Pebble Grants is our small funding stream for UK registered charities which are raising money for projects where the total cost is less than £1million. If you are raising money for a particular project for which the mainstay is capital costs (building work, refurbishment or the purchase of long-term equipment) and have already raised a third of the total costs, you may be eligible for this. Organisations must have income less than £500,000 and the usual donated amount is £1000.

 

Span Trust
https://www.spantrust.org.uk/

The Span Trust awards grants of £5K to £20K to help alleviate the effects of poverty, disability, age or ill health, and advance urban regeneration through the improvement of the built environment. They aim to do this in areas of social and economic deprivation, in particular through the provision, maintenance or improvement of public amenities for the benefit of the local community, support for building projects that contribute to the wellbeing of individuals, and public recreational space and facilities for the benefit of the local community. Applications accepted twice annually in January and July.

 

Sport England
https://www.sportengland.org

Since 2012, Sport England have made disability sport a key focus of their work, investing over £170 million. One of their funding streams is for:
Facilities – £7.5m fund to invest in facilities, especially multi-sport. The Community Asset Fund will award grants of £5-150k to organisations looking to take over sports facilities, sports clubs looking to expand, or ideas for projects clearly needed in the local community.

 

Trusthouse Charitable Foundation
http://www.trusthousecharitablefoundation.org.uk

The foundation has a specific capital grants programme. They give grants to small, well-established organisations in the UK with annual income under £500K, who address local issues in areas of extreme urban deprivation. Particular interests include organisations working in community support, education and arts, and Disabled people are named as a priority. Their urban grants are only for projects in urban areas classified in the latest government Indices of Multiple Deprivation as being in the lowest 20%. Applications can be made at any time.

Capital grant applications go to quarterly Committee meetings in January, April, July and November. These are grants between £7500 and £60,000 for one-off capital costs, where the total project cost does not exceed £2M. Applicants must have secured a minimum of 50% of the total project cost before applying.

 

The Wolfson Foundation
http://www.wolfson.org.uk/funding/health-and-disability/

Main grants programme provides support with capital initiatives, i.e. buildings (new build or refurbishment) and equipment. They are interested in supporting a range of organisations (including charities working with Disabled people or mental health needs. They are particularly interested in capital projects which encourage independence or a focus on training, employment and supported housing, or transition from children’s services to adults’ services. Usual grant range is £20-£75K. Application deadlines in January and July of each year.

 

Yorkshire Building Society Charitable Foundation
http://www.ybs.co.uk/your-society/charity/charitable-foundation/index.html

The foundation is largely funded by the building society’s members, who give a proportion of the interest they gain from their savings accounts. In recognition of this, the trustees give priority to causes recommended by the society’s members and colleagues. Grants are given for the purchase of equipment and tangible items only, to be used directly by the beneficiaries. Charities/causes recommended by YBS members and colleagues will be considered for a donation of up to £2000; for those not associated, the maximum donation is £500.

Applications are reviewed on a continual basis throughout the year.

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