Disabled people call on public to support hate crime campaign

With Hate Crime against Disabled People on the rise, Inclusion London are launching a London-wide campaign during National Hate Crime Awareness Week 12-19 October

Press release

With Hate Crime against Disabled People on the rise, Inclusion London are launching a London-wide campaign during 17-24-30’s National Hate Crime Awareness Week 12-19 October, so Disability hate crime is recognised for what it is and Disabled victims get the support they need.

There are an estimated 1.2 million Disabled people[1] in London who are part of our communities. One in five Disabled people report they have either experienced hostile or threatening behaviour or even been attacked[2]. Disabled people are often perceived as vulnerable or somehow inferior. These attitudes can lead to being targeted because of who they are.  Despite such high incidence of hate crime, most of it goes unreported.  Research shows that nine out of ten Disabled people do not report hate crime, often due to the frequency of incidents and feeling that they will not be believed[3]
Inclusion London is the lead organisation for a network of Deaf & Disabled People Organisations across London who provide services to an estimated 80,376 people a year, 95% of which are Disabled/Deaf people. Those organisations witness disability hate crime every day and provide vital support to Disabled victims. The campaign asks everyone to join in on social media to raise awareness of hate crime against Disabled people and has information on services that offer specialist support.

Louise Holden, Hate Crime Partnership Manager at Inclusion London says:
“We would not dream of hurting someone. But for many Disabled people hate crime is a daily experience. Being targeted because of who you are can have a severe and longer lasting impact on victims and families than other crimes. We don’t want any Disabled person to suffer alone so getting the message out there about support available is vital.”

Information about the campaign is available at  https://www.inclusionlondon.org.uk/campaigns-and-policy/act-now/love-not-hate-no-place-for-disability-hate-crime/

Ends

Notes for Editors

The London DDPO Hate Crime Partnership is funded for 5 years by the National Lottery Community Fund, Trust for London and 3 Guineas Trust, which is now in its second year and is supporting a Pan-London partnership between Deaf & Disabled People’s Organisations (DDPO) with capacity building, campaigning and policy work.
We are committed to growing this partnership to provide a network of support so no Disabled person needs to suffer alone if they experience Hate Crime.
We have the support of Anne Novis who was awarded an MBE for her tireless campaigning to get Disability Hate Crime recognised and responded to appropriately. Anne is currently the Chair of Inclusion London and is an independent advisor to the Metropolitan Police and Crown Prosecution Service.
At the moment, there is Tell Mama for Islamophobic related hate crime; GALOP for LGBT+ community and CST for the Jewish community. Disabled people can be victims of any type of hate crime. We are establishing this partnership to be the voice for Disabled people in London, campaigning for parity in the law and raising awareness of Hate Crime against Disabled people. We work closely with other Hate Crime organisations, the Met. Police and Mayor’s Office for Police and Crime (MOPAC).


(Photo credit: Taken by Ellen Clifford during Global Disability Summit 2018, Mary Ellen, Disabled Activist and Artist #MessageInANappy #MakingTheInvisibleVisible)

Facts and figures

We are using the term Disabled to cover a range of conditions and impairments including Mental Health Trauma and Distress, Learning Disability, Learning Difficulty, Neuro-Diverse, Physical, Sensory, Chronic long-term conditions and Deaf Community.
There are an estimated 1.2 million Disabled people in London.
One in five Disabled people report they have either experienced hostile or threatening behaviour or even been attacked[4].
Despite such high incidences of hate crime, most of it goes unreported[5].
Research shows that nine out of ten Disabled people do not report hate crime, often due to the frequency of incidents and feeling that they will not be believed[6].
Met. Police report that there have been spikes in all strands of hate crime due to the referendum and Brexit. Disability Hate Crime is second only to Race Hate Crime in the percentage of crimes involving violence, according to Home Office statistics[7].

Contact information

For more information or to arrange interviews contact
Louise Holden, Hate Crime Partnership Manager Tel: 07741 733 993
Svetlana Kotova, Campaigns and Justice Director Tel: 07907 495 112
336 Brixton Road London SW9 7AA
Telephone 020 7237 3181 Email louise.holden@inclusionlondon.org.uk
Website https://www.inclusionlondon.org.uk/