Support the SEND Action court case

Join ALLFIE and support this important court case on Wed 26th and Thu 27th June

Disabled children v Secretary of State for Education and Chancellor of the Exchequer

ALLFIE (the Alliance for Inclusive Education) is supporting a case by campaign group SEND Action. This case centres on the lawfulness of government cuts to SEND (Special Educational Needs and Disability) provision.  ALLFIE and Inclusion London will be attending this important court case on Wednesday 26th and Thursday 27th June at the Royal Court of Justice, Strand, London WC2A 2LL. Put it in your diaries – come and join us from 9am onwards and show your support for disabled children and their families as they fight for proper support.

If you would like an opportunity to speak outside the court case, do join us between 12.00 noon – 1.30 pm on Wednesday or between 9.00 am – 10.30 am on Thursday.

Alternatively you can email or send us a statement that we can read out. Contact: Simone Aspis  email: simone.aspis@allfie.org.uk Tel No : 0207-737-6030  mobile number : 07856-213-837

For further information about the court hearing – follow the web-link : https://www.allfie.org.uk/news/blog/disabled-children-v-secretary-of-state-for-education-and-chancellor-of-the-exchequer/

Update

More than 40,000 people have signed the ALLFIE petition calling on the government not to shut disabled people out of mainstream education, and to increase SEND funding.

Tracey Lazard, chief executive of Inclusion London stated outside the court on Wednesday:

“This government is failing our disabled children, creating a lost and invisible generation of disabled children who have been shut out of education or left in schools deprived of the support they need. It is a scandal in the fifth richest country in the world. This is one of the more shameful examples of the disproportionate impact of austerity on disabled people. This government has to acknowledge the damage it is doing to our country and start working with us to get our equality and inclusion back on track. They could start by committing to article 24 of UNCRPD.”